1887

Abstract

A peptide from the carboxyl-terminal region of the Mengo virus capsid protein VP1, representing residues 259 to 277, can induce serum neutralizing (SN) antibodies in both the mouse and guinea-pig. This peptide, termed F164, also induces high levels of protective neutralizing antibodies in mice subsequent to immunization; 87 to 100% of mice are refractory to the effects of an intraperitoneal challenge of 100 LD of Mengo virus. The mouse model discussed herein will prove useful for studying the immune response to Mengo virus and evaluating the immunogenicity of individual viral components.

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1991-05-01
2021-10-18
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