1887

Abstract

We have determined the genomic location and nucleotide sequence of the equine herpesvirus 4 thymidine kinase (TK) gene. The gene is positioned at approximately 0·48 map units within the long unique component of the genome and is flanked by genes encoding a herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL24 homologue and glycoprotein H. The predicted protein is composed of 352 amino acids, has an of 38 800 and exhibits 36 % identity to the predicted TK of HSV-1.

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1990-08-01
2024-06-25
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