1887

Abstract

Summary

Transcription from the early and late classes of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) promoters requires prior immediate early (IE) gene expression. Although the product of IE gene 1, Vmw110, is not absolutely essential for virus growth in tissue culture, transfection experiments have demonstrated that Vmw110 can activate gene expression both by itself and in a synergistic manner with the product of IE gene 3, Vmw175. This paper describes the construction of 10 mutant HSV-1 viruses with deletion and insertion mutations in Vmw110. The mutant viruses were then studied in single-step growth curve experiments, by assaying for plaques in a variety of cell types and by analysis of viral polypeptide synthesis during productive infection at high and low multiplicities. The results show that mutations in Vmw110 reduce the efficiency of plaque formation by HSV-1; the extent of this reduction depends on cell type and the position of the mutation in the polypeptide. In particular, a potential zinc finger domain is crucial for Vmw110 function. The patterns and amounts of viral polypeptide synthesis during high multiplicity infections with mutant and wild-type viruses were similar in all cell types. At low multiplicity, mutations in Vmw110 reduced viral gene expression in the least permissive cell type. The data suggest that the role of Vmw110 during virus infection in tissue culture is at a very early stage of low multiplicity infections; its inactivity leads to the failure to express viral genes so that the virus does not enter the lytic cycle.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-5-1185
1989-05-01
2022-09-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/70/5/JV0700051185.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-5-1185&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Campbell M. E. M., Palfreyman J. W., Preston C. M. 1984; Identification of herpes simplex virus DNA sequences which encode a trans-acting, polypeptide responsible for stimulation of immediate early transcription. Journal of Molecular Biology 180:1–19
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Dignam J. D., Lebovitz R. M., Roeder R. G. 1983; Accurate transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in a soluble extract from isolated mammalian nuclei. Nucleic Acids Research 11:1475–1489
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Everett R. D. 1984; Transactivation of transcription by herpes virus products; requirements for two HSV-1 immediate early polypeptides for maximum activity. EMBO Journal 3:3135–3141
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Everett R. D. 1986; The products of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early genes 1, 2 and 3 can activate HSV-1 gene expression in trans. Journal of General Virology 61:2507–2513
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Everett R. D. 1987a; The regulation of transcription of viral and cellular genes by herpesvirus immediate-early gene products. Anticancer Research 7:589–604
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Everett R. D. 1987b; A detailed mutational analysis of Vmw110, a trans-acting transcriptional activator encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1. EMBO Journal 6:2069–2076
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Everett R. D. 1988a; Analysis of the functional domains of herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early polypeptide Vmw110. Journal of Molecular Biology 202:87–96
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Everett R. D. 1988b; Promoter sequence and cell type can dramatically affect the efficiency of transcriptional activation induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 and its immediate-early gene products Vmw175 and Vmw110. Journal of Molecular Biology 203:739–751
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Gelman I. H., Silverstein S. 1985; Identification of immediate early genes from herpes simplex virus that transactivate the virus thymidine kinase gene. Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesU.S.A 82:5265–5269
    [Google Scholar]
  10. McGeoch D. J., Dalrymple M. A., Davison A. J., Dolan A., Frame M. C., McNab D., Perry L. I., Scott J. E., Taylor P. 1988; The complete DNA sequence of the long unique region in the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1. Journal of General Virology 69:1531–1574
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Marsden H. S., Stow N. D., Preston V. G., Timbury M. C., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Physical mapping of herpes simplex virus-induced polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:624–642
    [Google Scholar]
  12. O’hare P., Hayward G. S. 1985; Evidence for a direct role for both the 175,000- and 110,000-molecular-weight immediate-early proteins of herpes simplex virus in the transactivation of delayed-early promoters. Journal of Virology 53:751–760
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Perry L. J., Rixon F. J., Everett R. D., Frame M. C., Mcgeoch D. J. 1986; Characterization of the IE110 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1. Journal of General Virology 67:2365–2380
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Preston C. M. 1979; Control of herpes simplex virus type 1 mRNA synthesis in cells infected with wild-type virus or the temperature-sensitive mutant tsK . Journal of Virology 29:275–284
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Preston V. G., Davison A. I., Marsden H. S., Timbury M. C., Subak-Sharpe J. H., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Recombinants between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2: analyses of genome structures and expression of immediate-early polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:499–517
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Quinlan M. P., Knipe D. M. 1985; Stimulation of expression of a herpes simplex virus DNA-binding protein by two viral functions. Molecular and Cellular Biology 5:957–963
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Rigby P. W. J., Dieckmann M., Rhodes C., Berg P. 1977; Labelling deoxyribonucleic acid to high specific activity in vitro by nick translation with DNA polymerase I. Journal of Molecular Biology 113:237–251
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Russell J., Stow N. D., Stow E. C., Preston C. M. 1987; Herpes simplex virus genes involved in latency in vitro . Journal of General Virology 68:3009–3018
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Sacks W. R., Schaffer P. A. 1987; Deletion mutants in the gene encoding the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein ICP0 exhibit impaired growth in cell culture. Journal of Virology 61:829–839
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Sacks W. R., Greene C. C., Aschman D. P., Schaffer P. A. 1985; Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 is an essential regulatory protein. Journal of Virology 55:796–805
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Southern E. M. 1975; Detection of specific sequences among DNA fragments separated by gel electrophoresis. Journal of Molecular Biology 98:503–517
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Stow E. C., Stow N. D. 1989; Complementation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 Vmw110 deletion mutant by human cytomegalovirus. Journal of General Virology 70:695–704
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Stow N. D., Stow E. C. 1986; Isolation and characterization of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant containing a deletion within the gene encoding the immediate-early polypeptide Vmw 110. Journal of General Virology 67:2571–2585
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Stow N. D., Wilkie N. M. 1976; An improved technique for obtaining enhanced infectivity with herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA. Journal of General Virology 33:447–458
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Stow N. D., McMonagle E. C., Davison A. J. 1983; Fragments from both termini of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome contain signals required for the encapsidation of viral DNA. Nucleic Acids Research 11:8205–8220
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wagner E. K., Devi-Rao G., , Feldman L. T., Dobson A. T., Zhang Y-F., Flanagan W. M., Stevens J. G. 1988; Physical characterization of the herpes simplex virus latency-associated transcript in neurons. Journal of Virology 62:1194–1202
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Wilkie N. M. 1973; The synthesis and structure of herpesvirus DNA : the distribution of alkali-labile single strand interruptions in HSV-1 DNA. Journal of General Virology 21:453–467
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-5-1185
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-5-1185
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error