1887

Abstract

Summary

We have identified and characterized an origin of DNA replication in the genome of the human herpesvirus, varicella-zoster virus (VZV). This origin of replication (VZV ORI) is located within the major inverted repeats in a position equivalent to that occupied by one of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication origins. Products encoded by both VZV and HSV-1 activate cloned copies of VZV ORI, generating high molecular weight molecules consisting of tandem duplications of the input plasmid. The VZV ORI region contains a tract of alternating A and T residues located at the centre of symmetry of an almost perfect palindrome of 45 bp, and the use of plasmid deletion mutants has demonstrated that this tract is an important functional element of the origin. Two sequences common to the VZV ORI region and the regions specifying the two HSV-1 origins (ORI, located within the TR/IR regions, and ORI, located with in the U region) were identified and these may represent important recognition sites. One is an 11 bp sequence (CGTTCGCACTT), and the other is represented by the tract of alternating A and T residues. VZV does not appear to contain an origin of replication in a position equivalent to that of HSV-1 ORI.

Keyword(s): DNA replication origin , HSV-1 and VZV
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-67-8-1613
1986-08-01
2022-09-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/67/8/JV0670081613.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-67-8-1613&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bergsma D. J., Olive D. M., Hartzell S. W., Byrne B. J., Subramanian K. N. 1982; Cyclization of linear chimeric plasmids in vivo by a novel end-to-end joining reaction or by intramolecular recombination: one of the products contains a 147-bp perfect palindrome stable. in Escherichia coli. Gene 20:157–167
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Davison A. J. 1984; Structure of the genome termini of varicella-zoster virus. Journal of General Virology 65:1969–1977
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Davison A. J., MCgeoch D. J. 1986; Evolutionary comparisons of the S segments in the genomes of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus. Journal of General Virology 67:597–611
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Davison A., Rixon F. 1985; Cloning of the DNA of alphaherpesvirinae. In Recombinant DNA Research and Viruses pp 103–124 Edited by Becker Y. Boston: MartinusNijhoff;
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Davison A. J., Scott J. E. 1983; Molecular cloning of the varicella-zoster virus genome and derivation of six restriction endonuclease maps. Journal of General Virology 64:1811–1814
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Davison A. J., Scott J. E. 1985; DNA sequence of the major inverted repeat in the varicella-zoster virus genome. Journal of General Virology 66:207–220
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dvison A. J., Scott J. E. 1986; The complete DNA sequence of varicella-zoster virus. Journal of General Virology 67: (in press)
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Davison A. J., Wilkie N. M. 1981; Nucleotide sequences of the joint between the L and S segments of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. Journal of General Virology 55:315–331
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Davison A. J., Wilkie N. M. 1983; Location and orientation of homologous sequences in the genomes of five herpesviruses. Journal of General Virology 64:1927–1942
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Dumas A. M., Geelen J. L. M. C., Weststrate M. W., Wertheim P., Van Der Noordaa J. 1981; XbaI, PstI and BglII restriction enzyme maps of the two orientations of the varicella-zoster virus genome. Journal of Virology 39:390–400
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Frenkel N., Locker H., Vlazny D. A. 1980; Studies of defective herpes simplex viruses. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 354:347–370
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Gibbs J. S., Chiou H. C., Hall J. D., Mount D. W., Retondo M. J., Weller S. K., Coen D. M. 1985; Sequence and mapping analyses of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene predict a C-terminal substrate binding domain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A 82:7969–7973
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gray C. P., Kaerner H. C. 1984; Sequence of the putative origin of replication in the UL region of herpes simplex virus type 1 ANG DNA. Journal of General Virology 65:2109–2119
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Greaves D., Patient R. K. 1985; (AT). is an interspersed repeat in the Xenopus genome. EMBO Journal 4:2617–2626
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Greaves D. R., Patient R. K., Lilley D. M. J. 1985; Facile cruciform formation by an (A-T)34 sequence from a Xenopus globin gene. Journal of Molecular Biology 185:461–478
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Hanahan D. 1983; Studies on transformation of Escherichia coli with plasmids. Journal of Molecular Biology 166:557–580
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Haniford D. B., Pulleyblank D. E. 1985; Transition of a cloned d(AT)n-d(AT)n tract to a cruciform in vivo. Nucleic Acids Research 13:4343–4363
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Kieff E. D., Bachenheimer S. L., Roizman B. 1971; Size, composition, and structure of the deoxyribonucleic acid of herpes simplex virus subtypes 1 and 2. Journal of Virology 8:125–132
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Lacks S., Greenberg B. 1977; Complementary specificity of restriction endonucleases of Diplococcuspneumoniae with respect to DNA methylation. Journal of Molecular Biology 114:153–168
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Lilley D. M. J. 1980; The inverted repeat as a recognizable structural feature in supercoiled DNA molecules. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A 77:6468–6472
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Ludwig H., Haines H. G., Biswal N., Benyesh-Melnick M. 1972; The characterization of varicella-zoster virus DNA. Journal of General Virology 14:111–114
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Mcgeoch D. J. 1984; The nature of animal virus genetic material. In The Microbe: PartI, Viruses Society for General Microbiology Symposium, vol 36 pp 75–107 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Pattison J. R. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Macpherson I., Stoker M. G. 1962; Polyoma transformation of hamster cell clones - an investigation of genetic factors affecting cell competence. Virology 16:147–151
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Matthews R. E. F. 1982; Classification and nomenclature of viruses. Intervirology 17:1–199
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Maxam A. M., Gilbert W. 1980; Sequencing end-labeled DNA with base-specific chemical cleavages. Methods in Enzymology 65:499–560
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Mocarski E.S., Roizman B. 1982; Herpesvirus-dependent amplification and inversion of cell-associated viral thymidine kinase gene flanked by viral a sequences and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 79:5626–5630
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Panayotatos N., Wells R. D. 1981; Cruciform structures in supercoiled DNA. Nature, London 289:466–470
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Quinn J. P., Mcgeoch D. J. 1985; DNA sequence of the region in the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 containing the genes for DNA polymerase and the major DNA binding protein. Nucleic Acids Research 13:8143–8163
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Roizman B. 1979; The structure and isomerization of herpes simplex virus genomes. Cell 16:481–494
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Sinden R. R., Broyles S. S., Pettijohn D. E. 1983; Perfect palindromic lac operator DNA sequence exists as a stable cruciform structure in supercoiled DNA in vitro but not in vivo. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 80:1797–1801
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Spaete R. R., Frenkel N. 1982; The herpes simplex virus amplicon: a new eucaryotic defective-virus cloning- amplifying vector. Cell 30:295–304
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Stow N. D. 1982; Localization of an origin of DNA replication within the TRS/IRSrepeated region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome. EMBO Journal 1:863–867
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Stow N. D. 1985; Mutagenesis of a herpes simplex virus origin of DNA replication and its effect on viral interference. Journal of General Virology 66:31–42
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Stow N. D., Mcmonagle E. C. 1983; Characterization of the TRS/IRS origin of DNA replication of herpes simplex virus type 1. Virology 130:427–438
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Stow N. D., Mcmonagle E. C., Davison A. J. 1983; Fragments from both termini of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome contain signals required for the encapsidation of viral DNA. Nucleic Acids Research 11:8205–8220
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Vlazny D. A., Frenkel N. 1981; Replication of herpes simplex virus DNA: localization of replication signals within defective virus genomes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 78:742–746
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Wagner E. K. 1985; Individual HSV transcripts: characterisation of specific genes. In The Herpesviruses vol 3 pp 45–104 Edited by Roizman B. New York & London: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Weller S. K., Spadaro A., Schaffer J. E., Murray A. W., Maxam A. M., Chaffer P. A. 1985; Cloning, sequencing, and functional analysis of oriL, a herpes simplex virus type 1 origin of DNA synthesis. Molecular and Cellular Biology 5:930–942
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Yates J., Warren N., Reisman D., Sugden B. 1984; A cis-acting element from the Epstein-Barr viral genome that permits stable replication of recombinant plasmids in latently infected cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A 81:3806–3810
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-67-8-1613
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-67-8-1613
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error