1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

nuclear polyhedrosis virus was highly pathogenic to both and . Plaque-purified variants from two of the original isolates showed much greater differences in pathogenicity to the two insect species than the original isolates. Plaque-purified variants from one of the isolates (D) nearly lost pathogenicity for while remaining pathogenic for . Some of the plaque-purified variants produced atypical symptoms, even in . These variants did not liquefy larvae and release polyhedra when the larvae died as is typical for nuclear polyhedrosis infections in Lepidoptera. These variants also produced fewer polyhedra per g larval weight and often had fewer virions per polyhedron. Light and electron microscopical studies of and infected with one of the original isolates (A) and two of the plaque-purified variants (B2 and D7) indicated that only infected with isolate A had the highly productive infection and viral morphogenesis typical of nuclear polyhedrosis viruses. Exposure of to isolate B2 or D7 resulted in a slightly delayed infection characterized by increased amounts of abnormal viral morphogenesis and polyhedra of decreased size. infected with isolate A or B2 had greatly reduced and delayed infections that were accompanied by highly variable abnormal viral morphogenesis; virtually no normal polyhedra were produced in these instances. Isolate D7 produced neither nucleocapsids nor polyhedra in . Large paracrystalline aggregates of nucleocapsids were common in infected with isolates B2 or D7 and in infected by isolate A. Infection of by isolate A or B2 was typified by the accumulation of large amounts of excess envelope membrane in the form of strands and vesicles of various sizes. Normal virogenic stromata were characteristics only of infected with isolate A or B2. Polyhedra produced in by even the most pathogenic isolates (A and B2) contained few if any normal virions and were not infective for either or .

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1249
1985-06-01
2022-01-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/66/6/JV0660061249.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1249&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Andrews R. E., Spence K. D., Miller L. K. 1980; Virulence of cloned variants of Autographa califomica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 39:932–933
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Burton R. L. 1969; Mass rearing the corn earworm in the laboratory. Agricultural Research Service ARS–134
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Chandler N. B., Schoenwolf G. C. 1983; Wrinkle-free sections for light microscopy. Stain Technology 58:238–239
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Chung K. L., Brown M., Faulkner P. 1980; Studies on the morphogenesis of polyhedral inclusion bodies of a baculovirus Autographa californica NPV. Journal of General Virology 46:335–347
    [Google Scholar]
  5. David W. A. L. 1975; The status of viruses pathogenic for insects and mites. Annual Review of Entomology 20:97–117
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Hamm J. J. 1968; Comparative histopathology of a granulosis and a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Spodoptera frugiperda. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 10:320–326
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hamm J. J. 1982; Relative susceptibility of several noctuid species to a nuclear polyhedrosis virus from Heliothis armiger. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 39:255–256
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Hink W. F., Vail P. V. 1973; A plaque assay for titration of alfalfa looper nuclear polyhedrosis virus in a cabbage looper (TN368) cell line. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 22:168–174
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Hirumi H., Hirumi K., Mcintosh A. H. 1975; Morphogenesis of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the alfalfa looper in a continuous, cabbage looper cell line. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 266:302–326
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Hunter D. K., Hoffmann D. F., Collier S. J. 1973; Cross-infection of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the almond moth to the Indian meal moth. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 22:186–192
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Knell J. D., Summers M. D. 1981; Investigation of genetic heterogeneity in wild isolates of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus by restriction endonuclease analysis of plaque-purified variants. Virology 112:190–197
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Knudson D. L., Harrap K. A. 1976; Replication of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus in a continuous cell culture of Spodoptera frugiperda: microscopy study of the sequence of events of the virus infection. Journal of Virology 17:254–268
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Mackinnon E. A., Henderson J. F., Stoltz D. B., Faulkner P. 1974; Morphogenesis of nuclear polyhedrosis virus under conditions of prolonged passage in vitro. Journal of Ultrastructure Research 49:419–435
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Potter K. N., Faulkner P., Mackinnon E. A. 1976; Strain selection during serial passage of Trichoplusia ni nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Journal of Virology 18:1040–1050
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Potter K. N., Jacques R. P., Faulkner P. 1978; Modification of Trichoplusia ni nuclear polyhedrosis virus passaged in vivo. Intervirology 9:76–85
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Ramoska W. A., Hink W. F. 1974; Electron microscope examination of two plaque variants from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 23:197–201
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Reynolds E. S. 1963; The use of lead citrate at high pH as an electron-opaque stain in electron microscopy. Journal of Celt Biology 17:208–212
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Smith G. E., Summers M. D. 1978; Analysis of baculovirus genomes with restriction endonucleases. Virology 89:517–527
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Snedecor G. W. 1956 Statistical Methods 5th edn 534 pp Ames: Iowa State University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Spurr A. R. 1969; A low-viscosity epoxy resin embedding medium for electron microscopy. Journal of Ultrastructure Research 26:31–43
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Summers M. D., Arnott H. J. 1969; Ultrastructural studies on inclusion formation and virus occlusion in nuclear polyhedrosis and granulosis virus-infected cells of Trichoplusia ni (Hiibner). Journal of Ultrastructure Research 28:462–480
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Tompkins G. J., Vaughn J. L., Adams J. R., Reichelderfer C. F. 1981; Effects of propagating Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus and its Trichoplusia ni variant in different hosts. Environmental Entomology 10:801–806
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Vail P. V., Jay D. L. 1973; Pathology of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the alfalfa looper in alternate hosts. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 21:198–204
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Vail P. V., Jay D. L., Stewart F. D., Martinez A. J., Dulmage H. T. 1978; Comparative susceptibility of Heliothis virescens and H. zea to the nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolated from Autographa californica. Journal of Economic Entomology 71:293–296
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Vail P. V., Knell J. D., Summers M. D., Cowan D. K. 1982; In vivo infectivity of Baculovirus isolates, variants, and natural recombinants in alternate hosts. Environmental Entomology 11:1187–1192
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1249
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1249
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error