1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

wild-type virus, in which the F protein is activated by trypsin but not by elastase, was spontaneously converted to a mutant with an F protein characterized by being activated by elastase alone. This spontaneous mutation generally occurred during serial passages of cells persistently infected with , even though the cells were first established by infection with plaque-purified wild-type virus. Multiple-cycle replication, plaque formation, haemolysis and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic () analysis showed that all the elastase-activated mutants isolated from carrier cells no longer required trypsin for F protein activation. At early passages, these protease activation mutants did not show temperature-sensitive () growth, while at a later stage the mutants, together with the mutation, appeared dominant. The frequency of such a protease activation mutation during passage in the carrier cells seemed to depend on the cell species, but was increased when compared to lytic infections.

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1982-08-01
2021-10-25
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