1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Cultures of starch-elicited peritoneal mouse macrophages in medium containing macrophage growth factor (MGF) were infected with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) and, after various times in culture, LDV production was monitored as a function of time by infectivity titrations in mice, by measuring [H]uridine incorporation into LDV RNA and extracellular LDV, by autoradiographic analysis of the proportion of productively infected cells and by electron microscopy. Regardless of the age of the cultures when infected with LDV, only a small proportion of the macrophages (generally between 3 and 20% of the total) became productively infected after a primary infection; maximum virus RNA synthesis and virus production occurred during the first 24 h after infection and then decreased precipitously. Productively infected macrophages could be readily recognized in electron micrographs of 24-h infected macrophage cultures and in sections of spleens from 24-h infected mice by characteristic morphological alterations. These consisted of formation of clusters of double-membrane vesicles with a diameter of 100 to 300 µm, budding of nucleocapsids into vesicles with single membranes and accumulation of mature virions in these vesicles. One to 4 days later, however, such cells were no longer found in infected cultures or spleens of infected mice and superinfection did not restimulate LDV replication. Cultures established with macrophages from 1-day LDV-infected mice also did not support LDV replication. We conclude that LDV replication in cultures or mice is limited to a single cycle in a subpopulation of macrophages and that infection leads to cell death and rapid phagocytosis of the dead cells by the resistant, uninfected macrophages.

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1982-04-01
2022-06-29
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