1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

A new strain (R) of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) was isolated from plants of the resistant cowpea plant introduction 186465 which were inoculated with the type strain (T). Strain R was serologically different from five naturally occurring CCMV strains. Furthermore, it was able to replicate in and systemically invade cowpea plants which were resistant to strain T. Pseudorecombinant studies with the RNAs of strains T and R established that RNA 1 controlled systemic invasion of the resistant cowpea cultivar. Both RNA 1 and RNA 3 influenced replication in resistant cowpeas. RNA 3 also controlled the composition of the coat protein, while RNA 1 influenced symptoms in susceptible cowpeas.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-49-2-289
1980-08-01
2022-01-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/49/2/JV0490020289.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-49-2-289&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bancroft J. B., Lane L. C. 1973; Genetic analysis of cowpea chlorotic mottle and brome mosaic viruses. Journal of General Virology 19:381–389
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bancroft J. B., McClean G. D., Rees M. W., Short M. N. 1971; The effect of an arginyl to a cysteinyl replacement on the uncoating behavior of a spherical plant virus. Virology 45:707–715
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bancroft J. B., Rees M. W., Dawson J. R. O., McClean G. D., Short M. N. 1972; Some properties of a temperature-sensitive mutant of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. Journal of General Virology 16:69–81
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Dolja V. V., Negruk V. I., Noirkor K., Atabekov J. G. 1977; A simple method for isolating pure RNA preparations after electrophoresis in acrylamide gels. Analytical Biochemistry 50:502–506
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Fulton J. P., Gamez R., Scott H. A. 1975; Cowpea chlorotic mottle and bean yellow stipple viruses. Phytopathology 65:741–742
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kuhn C. W. 1968; Identification and specific infectivity of a soybean strain of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. Phytopathology 58:1441–1442
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kuhn C. W., Wyatt S. D. 1979; A variant of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus obtained by passage through beans. Phytopathology 69:621–624
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Lane L. C. 1974; The bromoviruses. Advances in Virus Research 19:151–220
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Loening U. E. 1967; The fractionation of high-molecular-weight ribonucleic acid by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Biochemical Journal 102:251–257
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Sowell G. Jun, Kuhn C. W., Brantley B. B. 1965; Resistance of southern pea, Vigna sinensis, to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus. Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science 86:487–490
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Wyatt S. D., Kuhn C. W. 1977a; Some characteristics of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus replicated in resistant cowpeas. Proceedings of the American Phytophathological Society 4:143
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Wyatt S. D., Kuhn C. W. 1977b; Highly infectious RNA isolated from cowpea chlorotic mottle virus with low specific infectivity. Journal of General Virology 35:175–180
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Wyatt S. D., Kuhn C. W. 1979; Replication and properties of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus in resistant cowpeas. Phytopathology 69:125–129
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Zaumeyer W. J., Thomas H. R. 1950; Yellow stipple, a virus disease of bean. Phytopathology 40:847–859
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-49-2-289
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-49-2-289
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error