1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The physical state of the HSV 1 DNA present in two biochemically transformed cell lines, a revertant line and a supertransformed cell line, was determined. These cells all contained fragments of the HSV genome and the transformed and super-transformed cell lines expressed virus thymidine kinase. It was found that the virus DNA in these cells was maintained in a complex state with approximately half of the HSV DNA present in a covalently integrated state and the other half in a non-integrated state. There was no major cell line difference in the distribution of integrated and non-integrated virus DNA. RNA transcripts representing 5% of the HSV 1 genome are present in each of these lines. This is more than is required to code for the virus thymidine kinase present in the transformed and supertransformed cell lines and suggests the presence of other virus proteins in these cells.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-48-1-123
1980-05-01
2022-01-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/48/1/JV0480010123.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-48-1-123&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Adams A., Lindahl T. 1975; Epstein-Barr virus genomes with properties of circular DNA molecules in carrier cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of the United States of America 72:1477–1481
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Adams A., Lindahl T., Klein G. F. 1973; Linear association between cellular DNA and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 70:2888–2892
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Adams A., Bjursell G., Kaschka-Dierich C., Lindahl T. 1977; Circular Epstein-Barr virus genomes of reduced size in a human lymphoid cell line of infectious mononucleosis origin. Journal of Virology 22:373–380
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bellett A. J. D. 1975; Covalent integration of viral DNA into cell DNA in hamster cells transformed by an avian adenovirus. Virology 65:427–435
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Biegeleisen K., Rush M. G. 1976; Association of Herpes simplex virus type i DNA with host chromosomal DNA during productive infection. Virology 69:246–257
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Botchan M., Topp W., Sambrook J. 1976; The arrangement of simian virus 40 sequences in the DNA of transformed cells. Cell 9:269–287
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Britten R. J., Kohne D. E. 1968; Repeated sequences in DNA. Science 161:529–542
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Burger H., Doerfler W. 1974; Intracellular forms of adenovirus DNA. III. Integration of the DNA of adenovirus type 2 into host DNA in productively infected cells. Journal of Virology 13:975–992
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Chadha K. C., Munyon W. H., Hughes R. G. Jun 1977; Thymidine kinaseless revertants of Ltk cells transformed by HSV-1 are resistant to retransformation by homologous virus. Infection and Immunity 16:655–661
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Collard W., Thornton H., Green M. F. 1973; Cells transformed by human herpesvirus type 2 transcribe virus-specific RNA sequences shared by herpesvirus types 1 and 2. Nature New Biology 243:264–266
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Davis D. B., Kingsbury D. T. 1976; Quantitation of the viral DNA present in cells transformed by UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus. Journal of Virology 17:788–793
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Davis D. B., Munyon W., Buchsbaum R., Chawda R. 1974; Virus type-specific thymidine kinase in cells biochemically transformed by herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2. Journal of Virology 13:140–145
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Doerfler W. 1968; The fate of the DNA of adenovirus type 12 in baby hamster kidney cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 60:636–643
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Donner L., Dubbs D. R., Kit S. 1977; Chromosomal site(s) of integration of Herpes simplex virus type 2 thymidine kinase gene in biochemically transformed human cells. International Journal of Cancer 20:256–267
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gelb L. D., Kohne D. E., Martin M. A. 1971; Quantitation of simian virus 40 sequences in African greenmonkey, mouse and virus-transformed cell genomes. Journal of Molecular Biology 57:129–145
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Hirai K., Defendi V. 1972; Integration of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid into the deoxyribonucleic acid of permissive monkey kidney cells. Journal of Virology 9:705–707
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Jamieson A. T., Macnab J. C. M., Perbal B., Clements J. B. 1976; Virus specified enzyme activity and RNA species in herpes simplex virus type 1 transformed mouse cells. Journal of General Virology 32:493–508
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ketner O., Kelly T. J. Jun 1976; Integrated simian virus 40 sequences in transformed cell DNA: analysis using restriction endonucleases. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 73:1102–1106
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Kit S., Dubbs D. R. 1977; Regulation of herpesvirus thymidine kinase activity in LM(TK) cells transformed by ultraviolet light-irradiated herpes simplex virus. Virology 76:331–340
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Kraiselburd E., Gage L. P., Weissbach A. 1975; Presence of a herpes simplex virus DNA fragment in an L cell clone obtained after infection with irradiated herpes simplex virus 1. Journal of Molecular Biology 97:533–542
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Leiden J. M., Buttyan R., Spear P. G. 1976; Herpes simplex virus gene expression in transformed cells. I. Regulation of the viral thymidine kinase gene in transformed L cells by products of super-infecting virus. Journal of Virology 20:413–424
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Lin S.S., Munyon W. 1974; Expression of the viral thymidine kinase gene in herpes simplex virus-transformed L cells. Journal of Virology 14:1199–1208
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Lindahl T., Adams A., Bjursell G., Bornkamm, Kaschka-Dierich C., Jehn U. 1976; Covalently closed circular duplex DNA of Epstein-Barr virus in a human lymphoid cell line. Journal of Molecular Biology 102:511–530
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Munyon W., Kraiselburd E., Davis D., Mann J. 1971; Transfer of thymidine kinase to thymidine kinaseless L cells by infection with ultraviolet-irradiated Herpes simplex virus. Journal of Virology 7:813–820
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Munyon W., Buchsbaum R., Paoletti E., Mann J., Kraiseland E., David D. 1972; Electrophoresis of thymidine kinase activity synthesized by cells transformed by herpes simplex virus. Virology 49:683–689
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Padgett R. A., Moore D. F., Kingsbury D. T. 1978; Herpes simplex virus nucleic acid synthesis following infection of nonpermissive XC cells. Journal of General Virology 40:605–614
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Pellicer A., Wigler M., Axel R., Silverstein S. 1978; The transfer and stable integration of the HSV thymidine kinase gene into mouse cells. Cell 14:133–141
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Sambrook J., Westphal H., Srinivasan P. R., Dulbecco R. 1968; The integrated state of viral DNA in SV40-transformed cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 60:1288–1293
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Sugino W. M., Kingsbury D. T. 1976; DNA homologies between strains of herpes simplex virus. Virology 71:605–608
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Sugino W. M., Chadha K. D., Kingsbury D. T. 1977; Quantification of the herpes simplex virus DNA present in biochemically transformed mouse cells and their revertants. Journal of General Virology 36:111–122
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Thouless M. E., Chandha K. C., Munyon W. H. 1976; Serological specificity of thymidine kinase activity in herpes simplex virus-transformed L cells. Virology 69:350–351
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Tyndall C., Younghusband H. B., Bellett A. J. 1978; Some adenovirus DNA is associated with the DNA of permissive cells during productive or restricted growth. Journal of Virology 25:1–10
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Varmus H. E., Vogt P. K., Bishop J. M. 1973; Integration of deoxyribonucleic acid specific for Rous sarcoma virus after infection of permissive and nonpermissive hosts. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 70:3067–3071
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Varmus H. E., Heasley S., Linn J., Wheeler K. 1976; Use of alkaline sucrose gradients in a zonal rotor to detect integrated and unintegrated avian sarcoma virus-specific DNA in cells. Journal of Virology 18:574–585
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Wigler M., Silverstein S., Lee L. S., Pellicer A., Cheng Y. C., Axel R. 1977; Transfer of purified herpes virus thymidine kinase gene to cultured mouse cells. Cell 11:223–232
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-48-1-123
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-48-1-123
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error