1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Analysis of the infected cell polypeptides and the DNA restriction profiles of 31 HSV-1 isolates from the trigeminal, superior cervical and vagus ganglia from 17 individuals (12 U.S.A., 2 Japanese, 3 Norwegian) could be classified as 15 different virus strains. With the exception of the three Norwegian isolates which gave identical profiles, virus isolates from the ganglia of different individuals could all be distinguished from one another. In contrast virus isolates from the trigeminal, superior cervical and vagus ganglia of the same individual, or virus isolates from the left and right ganglia of the same individual or multiple isolates from different explants of a single ganglion were indistinguishable. In conclusion, a single virus strain infects each individual initially and virus descended from this event subsequently infects and becomes latent in different cells of the same ganglion as well as in different ganglia.

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1979-04-01
2022-01-28
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