1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Subcellular responses of leaf cells to infection by bean yellow stipple virus, a strain of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), in two varieties of bean, L., and three varieties of cowpea, (Torner) Savi, were investigated by electron microscopy. Amorphous inclusions (AI), filamentous inclusions (FI), which appeared to be characteristic of CCMV infection, and membranous vesicles (30 to 100 nm in diam.), containing fibrils and virus particles, were consistently found in cells in all infected hosts. The AI occurred in cytoplasm as granular masses sandwiched between the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and the nuclear envelope (NE) at an early stage of infection. In later samples AI were scattered randomly in masses of various sizes, numbers and shapes. Electron lucent areas containing virus particles were present in large masses of AI. The FI were long, unbranched, flexuous, rod-like structures of 17 nm in diam. They appeared after AI were formed in the cytoplasm and also occurred in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic FI were usually associated with AI, and nuclear FI with the nucleolus. Intranuclear virus particles were observed only when FI were located in the nuclei. Both FI and AI were similarly degraded by treatment with subtilisin or pronase, but virus particles were not. Fibril-containing vesicles arising from the membranes of NE and RER were concurrently present in the perinuclear space and the lumen of ER associated with AI and FI.

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1977-06-01
2021-10-18
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