1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Examination of P3HR-1 cells (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] producer) persistently infected with the MAL strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) suggested that only a few cells were actively producing a virus indistinguishable from HSV-1 (MAL) despite the presence of immunofluorescent HSV-1 antigens associated with the majority of cells. EBV-specific immunofluorescence was not altered in HSV-1 persistently infected P3HR-1 cells. HSV-1 persistently infected cells, labelled for 72 h with C-thymidine, incorporated approx. 8% of the label into cell associated HSV-1 DNA as resolved by caesium chloride gradients. Values greater than 8% of the total were suggested by hybridization of gradient fractions with H-HSV-1 DNA.

To determine whether the establishment of HSV persistent infections in Burkitt lymphoma derived cells was a general phenomenon, six strains of HSV-1 (MAL, KOS, Patton, Syn R, BF and Syn V) and two strains of type 2 (333 and MS) were used to infect the P3HR-1 and Raji (EBV non-producer) cell lines derived from Burkitt lymphomas. In P3HR-1 cells, persistent infections were established with all strains of HSV-1 but not with HSV-2. In Raji cells, persistent infections were established with all strains of HSV-1, except Syn V, and with both strains of HSV-2. No external support was required to maintain these infections.

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1976-07-01
2022-01-18
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