1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Persistent states of measles virus infection have been established in HeLa cells by using Edmonston strain virus and two types of measles virus vaccine (M-VAC and Schwarz). The absolute amount of surface viral antigens expressed on these cells infected separately with the three viruses has been assessed by a newly developed method which employs [I]-labelled Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from immune human sera. This method was used to determine the level of viral antigenic expression on acutely infected HeLa cells harvested at a time when 95 to 100% of cells could be lysed by antiviral antibody and complement. From our data, more than 1 × 10 antibody molecules must bind to each cell infected with measles virus before complement dependent lysis can occur in a homologous test system. Persistently infected cells bind 2 to 3 times less antibody than acutely infected cells and correspondingly exhibit less susceptibility to humorally-mediated immune lysis.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-30-3-329
1976-03-01
2022-01-29
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