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Abstract

Faecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) is widely utilised for recurrent infection. Use of FMT for the intestinal eradication of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) has been described in the literature with decolonisation rates from 37.5% to 87.5%. We perform FMT via naso-gastric tube using donor stool prepared anaerobically, using prevention of invasive disease as an endpoint.

FMT was considered for either; 1) Patients who were colonised with >1 MDRO (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, vancomycin resistant Enterococci or extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) and at risk of invasive MDRO disease or 2) patients who had recurrent MDRO-mediated invasive disease.

Sixteen MDRO colonised/infected patients underwent FMT. Nine patients had a haematological disorder. Eight of these patients had had prolonged admissions (range 6-20 weeks) complicated by septic episodes (5/9 had a MDR bacteraemia) pre-FMT. Post FMT all patients had shorter admissions including five who received higher intensity immunosuppression. Only 1/9 developed MDRO-mediated invasive disease.

Seven FMT patients had recurrent ESBL urinary tract infections (UTIs). 4/7 were renal transplant patients. Following FMT the 3 non-transplant patients had no further UTIs up to six month period. Four transplant patients had reduced number of infections, admissions and use of antibiotics.

5/13 (39%) patients were not MDRO colonised on rectal screens post-FMT (follow up range 12 weeks – 24 months).

Although decolonisation rates were low, patient outcomes post-FMT were apparently improved. Mechanisms of FMT have not fully been established, improvement of colonisation resistance by restoration of microbiota composition or functionality in at risk groups could be more important than intestinal eradication.

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/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.fis2019.po0048
2020-02-28
2020-04-03
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.fis2019.po0048
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