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Abstract

This project aims to develop Chaplins, functional amyloid proteins from Streptomyces sp., into a novel nano-thin adhesive material for the defence industry through combining existing protein-based technology with a composite partner. Chaplin proteins were extracted from a range of wild-type strains, while a synthetic promoter system was developed to express and secrete chaplins, which are typically difficult to express and purify. Chaplin proteins were found to have potentially useful adhesive properties and we have been investigating their application in optically transparent adhesives, since adhesives currently used to bond laminated transparent materials are prone to water ingress resulting in degradation of optical clarity and delamination. These adhesives could also be lighter, thinner, and have a lower environmental impact. To determine the potential of this material as a novel synbio-adhesive for bonding glass and polycarbonate we have investigated the bonding ability and transparency of natural and engineered amyloid proteins, both alone and with partner biopolymers and bulking materials. We are now exploring ways to improve the properties of the proteins by modifying the amino acid sequences, incorporating binding domains to the composite partner and via chemical modifications. Our projects has provided proof-of-concept for the use of bio-inspired amyloid protein-based materialscompounds as both adhesives and corrosion resistant metal coatings. Supported by Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA), Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) project grants CDE100367 and ACC101824.

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/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.ac2019.po0512
2019-04-08
2019-10-20
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.ac2019.po0512
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