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Abstract

Respiratory illness caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) was first documented in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, followed by its rapid spread across the globe. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated viral/bacterial co-infection in the respiratory tract could modulate disease severity and its outcome in COVID-19 infection. In this retrospective study, 300 chronic liver disease patients with radiologically confirmed lower respiratory tract infection were enrolled from September 2020 to December 2021. In all of them, along with SARS-CoV-2, other respiratory viral/bacterial pathogens were studied. In total, 23.7 % (=71) patients were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Among the positive patients, 23.9 % (=17) had co-infection with other respiratory pathogens, bacterial co-infections being dominant. The SARS-CoV-2 negative cohort had 39.7  % positivity (=91) for other respiratory pathogens, the most common being those of the rhinovirus/enterovirus family. Ground glass opacity (GGO) with consolidation was found to be the most common radiological finding among SARS-CoV-2 positive co-infected patients, as compared to only GGO among SARS-CoV-2 mono-infected patients. Accurate diagnosis of co-infections, especially during pandemics including COVID-19, can ameliorate the treatment and management of suspected cases.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2022-10-03
2024-07-20
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