1887

Abstract

CNS infection is a life-threatening condition in developing countries and has been reported as the most common cause of bacterial meningitis; however, there is limited data on pneumococcal meningitis in Indonesia. This cross-sectional study aimed to isolate and identity strains from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens collected as part of routine testing from patients with clinically diagnosed central nervous system infection at a national referral hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia in 2017. isolation and identification were performed using conventional culture and molecular tools. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were monitored through minimum inhibitory concentration testing. From 147 CSF specimens, one strain was identified from a patient with bacterial meningitis symptoms. The isolate was serotype 6B (ST5661) and susceptible to 18 antimicrobial agents tested, including penicillin, tetracycline, and the macrolide group. Our data provide insights into the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in Indonesia.

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2020-03-26
2020-03-31
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