1887

Abstract

While the world is still recovering from the Covid-19 pandemic, monkeypox virus (MPXV) awaits to cause another global outbreak as a challenge to all of mankind. However, the Covid-19 pandemic has taught us a lesson to speed up the pace of viral genomic research for the implementation of preventive and treatment strategies. One of the important aspects of MPXV that needs immediate insight is its evolutionary lineage based on genomic studies. Utilizing high-quality isolates from the GISAID (Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data) database, primarily sourced from Europe and North America, we employed a SNP-based whole-genome phylogeny method and identified four major clusters among 628 MPXV isolates. Our findings indicate a distinct evolutionary lineage for the first MPXV isolate, and a complex epidemiology and evolution of MPXV strains across various countries. Further analysis of the host–pathogen interaction network revealed key viral proteins, such as E3, SPI-2, K7 and CrmB, that play a significant role in regulating the network and inhibiting the host’s cellular innate immune system. Our structural analysis of proteins E3 and CrmB revealed potential disruption of stability due to certain mutations. While this study identified a large number of mutations within the new outbreak clade, it also reflected that we need to move fast with the genomic analysis of newly detected strains from around the world to develop better prevention and treatment methods.

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2023-04-12
2024-05-21
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