1887

Abstract

Insect–bacterial symbioses are ubiquitous, but there is still much to uncover about how these relationships establish, persist and evolve. The tsetse endosymbiont displays intriguing metabolic adaptations to its microenvironment, but the process by which this relationship evolved remains to be elucidated. The recent chance discovery of the free-living species of the genus , , provides a serendipitous starting point from which to investigate the evolution of this symbiosis. Here, we present a flux balance model for and empirically verify its predictions. Metabolic modelling is used in combination with a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to explore the trajectories that may have undertaken from this starting point after becoming internalized. The order in which key genes are lost is shown to influence the evolved populations, providing possible targets for future genetic manipulation. This method provides a detailed perspective on possible evolutionary trajectories for in this fundamental process of evolutionary and ecological change.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Stephen Thorpe , Wellcome Trust , (Award WT095024MA)
  • Rebecca J Hall , Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council , (Award BB/M011151/1)
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2020-06-16
2020-08-09
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