1887

Microbiology

The Microbiology Editorial Board has been organised by the topic areas of the journal, emphasising the breadth of microbiology as a field, and streamlining the submission process for authors. On submission, authors are encouraged to highlight a suitable handling Editor in their cover letter. 

Editor-in-Chief

Gavin Thomas Twitter

University of York, UK 

Deputy Editor-in-Chief

Tracy Palmer Twitter
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK


Reviews Editor

Andrew Preston University of Bath, UK 


Microbe Profiles Editor

Gail Preston University of Oxford, UK


Senior Editors

Michael Brockhurst University of Manchester, UK

Jen Cavet University of Manchester, UK

Steve Diggle Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA

David Grainger Birmingham University, UK

Riccardo Manganelli University of Padua, Veneto, Italy

Isabelle Martin-Verstraete Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

Hana Sychrová Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic 

Martin Welch University of Cambridge, UK


Editors

This topic area covers the discovery and characterisation of antibiotics and other natural products, including studies on mechanism of actions and mechanisms of resistance (AMR) and the understanding and manipulation of their biosynthesis. This area also includes studies on the mechanisms that underpin the evolution and spread of resistance genes.

Robert Abramovitch Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA

My research includes discovery and development of small molecules inhibiting Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth, persistence and adaptation to host immune cues.

Jessica Blair University of Birmingham, UK

My research focusses on molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, in particular resistance mediated by efflux pumps. I’m interested in the role of efflux in AMR and non-AMR related phenotypes such as virulence, regulation of efflux and structure/function of efflux pumps. I am also interested in how efflux and drug accumulation can be measured.

Katherine Duncan University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

My research interests include microbial chemical biology, in particular Actinobacteria-specialized metabolism and marine natural product and linking genomics and metabolomics data for accelerated antibiotic discovery.

Susanne Gebhard University of Bath, UK

My research interests are on the responses of Gram-positive bacteria to antimicrobials, particularly those targeting the cell envelope, with a focus on signalling, gene regulation and function of resistance genes.

James Hall University of Liverpool, UK

My current research advances our understanding of the patterns and processes in microbial evolution, using findings from studies on horizontal gene transfer and mobile genetic elements in relation to AMR.

Stineke van Houte University of Exeter, UK

I am interested in the epidemiology of AMR and the mechanisms and evolution of horizontal gene transfer, with the aims of developing new evolution-proof antimicrobial tools to tackle drug-resistant infections.

Matt Hutchings John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

I search unusual ecological niches such as the nests of fungus growing ants to find and study new antimicrobials that could be developed for clinical use.

Ayush Kumar University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

My research interests focus on the mechanisms of AMR that have evolved in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, particularly those involving drug efflux. I am also interested in studying environmental determinants of resistance as well as the presence of AMR in the environment.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include antifungal drugs – their mechanisms of action and resistance. I am also interested in screening for novel antifungal molecules.

Despoina Mavridou University of Texas at Austin, USA

I am interested in the role of cell envelope protein homeostasis in AMR. In particular, the importance of folding catalysts, such as disulfide-bond-formation proteins, chaperones and proteases for the function of major antibiotic resistance determinants.

Daniel Neill University of Liverpool, UK

My research aims to develop antimicrobial adjuvants or potentiators to combat high levels of AMR seen in pathogens of the cystic fibrosis lung.

Kelli Palmer University of Texas at Dallas, USA

I study antimicrobials and AMR in Gram-positive bacteria. I use genomic and genetic approaches to study resistance plasmids and their interactions with bacterial genome defence systems such as CRISPR-Cas.

Kai Papenfort Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany

My research aims to understand the global regulatory patterns of pathogens towards harmful substances and identify new mechanisms of AMR.

Willem van Schaik University of Birmingham, UK

My research investigates the diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in complex microbial communities, including the gut microbiome.

Thamarai Schneiders University of Edinburgh, UK

My research interests include the role of intrinsic mechanisms, particularly stress related transcription factors, that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, fitness and survival in gram-negative bacteria.

Henrik Strahl Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, UK

My research focusses on screening and developing novel, cell envelope-targeting antimicrobials, and in studying the mode of action of antibacterial compounds, both novel and those already in use.

Marjan van der Woude University of York, UK

My expertise in gene regulation and genetics of Gram-negative bacteria, and bacterial communities and biofilms can be applied to the understanding of the occurrence, spread and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

This topic area covers the understanding, engineering and utilization of microbial cellular and biomolecular processes to develop or improve technologies and products. This includes the development and application of synthetic biology tools and methodology.

Fabian Commichau University of Göttingen, Germany

My research uses Bacillus subtilis as a chassis to develop novel routes for commercial production of vitamin B6.

Brigitte Gasser University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria

My research interests include the application and engineering of yeast systems, including Pichia pastoris in biotechnology particularly around recombinant protein expression.

Susanne Gebhard University of Bath, UK

I have an interest in biotechnological application of bacteria, primarily of the genus Bacillus, and genetic engineering of bacteria for application.

Jeffrey Gralnick University of Minnesota, St Paul, USA

I study bacteria capable of extracellular electron transfer, a process that can be used in microbial fuel cells and in biosensors. I also use synthetic biology approaches to manipulate a range of environmental bacteria to enhance metabolic capabilities and to understand metabolism.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include fungal-based synthetic biology approaches and developments and fungal biotechnology.

Pedro Oliveira Genoscope, Évry France
My research interests include genetic instability in nucleic acid- and cell-based biopharmaceuticals, and genome engineering.

Nicholas Tucker University of Strathcylde, Glasgow, UK

My research interests include improving industrial strain performance and stress resistance to facilitate the sustainable production of plastics, particularly in Pseudomonas spp.

Vittorio Venturi International Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste, Italy

My research interests include plant microbiomes and the development of microbial products for a more sustainable agriculture such as plant growth promoting bacteria.

This topic areas covers all levels of cell biological studies of microbes, including those around cell growth, division, differentiation, and death. This also includes areas of cell signalling, intracellular trafficking and cell movement and motility.

Gautam Dey European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany 

I have an interest in the organisation of the nucleus and nuclear envelope; nuclear division and mitosis; syncytial division; nuclear remodelling in Ichthyosporea, Fungi, Amoebozoa and Apicomplexa; archaeal cell biology.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include yeast morphogenesis.

Kelli Palmer University of Texas at Dallas, USA

I investigate membrane lipid biology in bacteria and the roles of lipids in antimicrobial resistance, stress responses, and pathogenicity.

Pauline Schaap University of Dundee, UK

My research interests involve identifying genes in protozoa involved in encystation and pathways that regular spore and stalk cell encapsulation in Dictyostelia.

Henrik Strahl Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, UK

My research interests cover how bacterial cells establish their cell morphology through spatially organised cell wall synthesis, and how cells establish internal cellular organisation though spatial cues including peripheral membrane binding, membrane curvature-dependent localisation, and nucleoid exclusion.

This topic area covers processes that occur at the cell envelope and include biogenesis and remodelling of the cell wall, outer membrane and cell surface structures. It also covers protein, carbohydrate and small molecule secretion and transport processes.

Jessica Blair University of Birmingham, UK

I have expertise in the study of the cell surface, mainly in relation to AMR. This includes study of efflux pumps and efflux complexes as well as understanding how drugs enter and leave cells.

David Clarke University College Cork, Ireland

My research interests include understanding the genetics of membrane structure, function and homeostasis in Gram negative bacteria and the production of bioactive lipids by bacteria.

Rebecca Hall University of Kent, UK

I am interested in how adaptation of microbes, specifically fungi, to the environment of the human host regulates changes in the structure and organisation of the microbial cell surface, and the consequences this remodelling has on the host-pathogen interaction.

Nathalie Juge Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK

My research focuses on the role of glycans in the interaction between the gut bacteria and the host. I am interested in how gut bacteria transport and degrade dietary or host (mucin) glycans, and the role of microbial and host cell surface glycosylation in the communication between the gut microbiota and the host.

Kimberly Kline Nanyang Technological University

My lab focuses on the pathogenic strategies of Enteroocccus faecalis within biofilm-associated infections. With respect to cell surfaces, we are particularly interested in the regulation and biogenesis of Enterococcal sortase-assembled pili, important for biofilms in a variety of environments.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include the structure and regulation of yeast cell walls.

Despoina Mavridou University of Texas at Austin, USA

My research interests include the study of biochemical processes that take place near or on the cell surface. Such processes are mostly linked to bacterial virulence and antimicrobial resistance as well as interbacterial competition.

Thamarai Schneiders University of Edinburgh, UK

My research interests in gene regulation in Gram-negative bacteria include the study of membrane permeability and structure in antibiotic entry.

Nichollas Scott University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

I am interested in the biosynthesis of glycoconjugates and surface glycans, including the chemical diversity of microbial glycans, often exploiting biophysical approaches like mass spectrometry.

Willem van Schaik University of Birmingham, UK

My research interests include modifications to cell surfaces linked to resistance to the last-resort antibiotics vancomycin (Enterococcus faecium) and colistin (in Enterobacteriaceae).

Henrik Strahl Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, UK

My research focusses on bacterial cell wall synthesis, and bacterial membranes, their homeostasis and internal organisation through lipid domain formation.

Meera Unnikrishnan University of Warwick, UK

My research interests include type VII secretion systems and bacterial colonisation factors.

Meg Vickerman University of Buffalo, NY, USA

I am involved in several projects that investigate and characterize the cell surface adhesins and glucan polymers of oral streptococci that modulate their adhesive interactions with saliva as well as other members of the oral microbiota when forming multispecies biofilms.

Marjan van der Woude University of York, UK

I apply my interest in gene regulation and bacterial communities to assess surface structures of Gram negative bacteria (i.e. outer membrane proteins, type V secretion systems, fimbriae, LPS) to understand how they define the interactions with the host, other bacteria, or bacteriophage.

This topic area covers interactions that occur between cells of the same and different species and their impact on microbial fitness and community function. This includes interactions between species within microbiomes.

David Clarke University College Cork, Ireland

My research interests include understanding the molecular mechanisms that underpin bacteria-host interactions, with a particular focus on beneficial interactions.

Gautam Dey European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany 

My research interests include archaeal-bacterial symbioses.

Katherine Duncan University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

My research interests include ecological, evolutionary, environmental and biogeographic impacts on prokaryotic-prokaryotic and prokaryotic-eukaryotic interactions and the resulting phenotypic and metabolomic responses.

Jeffrey Gralnick University of Minnesota, St Paul, USA

I am interested in understanding how environmental bacteria interact with each other and their hosts with a particular emphasis on laboratory-based experiments where ecological ideas can be tested.

James Hall University of Liverpool, UK

My research aims to understand the evolutionary ecology of interactions between microbes, with animals and plants, and with and between parasitic and mutualistic mobile genetic elements like bacteriophage and plasmids.

Stineke van Houte University of Exeter, UK

I am interested in the mechanisms and evolutionary consequences underlying interactions between bacterial hosts and mobile genetic elements (MGEs), between MGEs, and between hosts interactions. I also study how a microbial community context can change the nature and consequences of these individual interactions, and in turn, what the (evolutionary) consequences of these interactions are for community composition and function. 

Matt Hutchings John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

I work on plants and insects such as leafcutter ants which recruit antibiotic producing bacteria and exchange food and housing in return for antibiotics to defend themselves against disease.

Nathalie Juge Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK

My research focuses on the role of glycans in the interaction between the gut bacteria and the host. I am interested in how bacteria metabolise dietary or host glycans in the gut and the impact of cross-feeding on the structure and function of the gut microbiota.

Kimberly Kline Nanyang Technological University

I study how E. faecalis senses and responds to the various environments it finds itself in – from the gut, to the urinary tract, to wounds, to heart valves – in order to form the biofilms that are important for its persistence in each of these niches. We are also very interested in understanding the polymicrobial interactions that occur during many Enterococcal infections.

Despoina Mavridou University of Texas at Austin, USA

I study the role of interbacterial competition in shaping bacterial communities. I focus on the regulation of bacteriocins and the composition of the type VI secretion system in order to examine how these factors contribute to the emergence of bacterial behaviour at the population level. 

Willem van Schaik University of Birmingham, UK

My research interests include microbial communities as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, and the impact of antibiotic therapy on the impact of the gut microbiome.

Meera Unnikrishnan University of Warwick, UK

My areas of interest include interactions within mixed biofilm communities and pathogen-commensal interactions.

Meg Vickerman University of Buffalo, NY, USA

I use genetic and genomic approaches to characterize determinants in streptococci and enterococci that influence their roles as healthy commensal microorganisms versus potential pathogens.

Marjan van der Woude University of York, UK

I have an interest in factors that affect the development of bacterial communities and assessing effects of inter-bacterial interactions on community structure. My approaches include combining bacterial genetics (mutations/building model strains) with imaging (single cell to population level) in bacterial pathogens using E. coli as a model system.

This topic area covers the evolution of microbes, including their evolutionary dynamics, evolutionary ecology, social evolution, molecular evolution, and adaptation. It includes evolutionary studies using experimental evolution, molecular biology, population genetics/genomics, or comparative genomics approaches, at the molecular, cellular, population or community scales. 

Gautam Dey European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany 

My interests include the evolution of the nucleus; eukaryogenesis, and experimental evolution. 

Jenna Gallie Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany

My current research is focused on the evolution of bacterial transfer RNAs (tRNAs). I am interested in how different bacterial tRNA complements emerge and persist and I investigate the mechanisms by which bacteria survive under starvation conditions in prolonged stationary phase, and the evolutionary dynamics of co-evolving populations of E. coli and phage lambda.

James Hall University of Liverpool, UK

My current research focuses on the contribution of horizontal gene transfer and mobile genetic elements to microbial evolution. I am interested in using experimental evolution and genome sequencing to identify targets and dynamics of evolution. I also have a long-standing interest in understanding how microbial evolution enables immune evasion by antigenic variation. 

Stineke van Houte University of Exeter, UK

I am interested in using experimental evolution approaches to understand how biotic and abiotic factors drive the evolution of bacterial immune systems, diversification, and adaptation. I study co-evolutionary processes between bacteria and mobile genetic elements including bacteriophages and plasmids and am interested in the evolutionary epidemiology of infectious diseases. 

Daniel Neill University of Liverpool, UK

Within host adaptation and evolution of bacterial respiratory pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We use in vitro and in vivo experimental evolution approaches to identify niche-specific influences on evolutionary trajectories of bacterial pathogens.

Pedro Oliveira Genoscope, Évry France

My interests include diversification of defence systems (defensome) and control of genetic flux in bacterial populations.

This topic area welcomes submissions that demonstrate the diversity of microbial metabolism (particularly for anaerobes); focus on how inter-species interactions influence microbial physiology; and examine how environmental challenges alter the physiology and metabolic interactions of the ecosystems.

Dany Beste University of Surrey, UK

My research interests involve the physiology and nutrient utilisation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the host; metabolic pathways for intracellular growth; adaptation to slow growth rate and different nutrients, and how the metabolism impacts on the development of AMR.

Claude Bruand INRAE (French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment), Toulouse, France

I have a long-standing interest in DNA metabolism. I recently focused on DNA double-strand break repair in rhizobia.

Jenna Gallie Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany

My research interests include the evolution and characterization of stochastic phenotype switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

Jeffrey Gralnick University of Minnesota, St Paul, USA

I am interested in understanding how environmental bacteria interact with each other and their hosts with a particular emphasis on laboratory-based experiments where ecological ideas can be tested.

Nicola Holden Scotland's Rural College, Edinburgh, UK

My research interests include metabolic flexibility and mesophile behaviour in enabling bacteria to colonise a wide range of hosts and persist under a wide range of physio-chemico environments, and how these responses dictates the likelihood of success for the organism.

Nathalie Juge Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK

My research focuses on the role of glycans in the interaction between the gut bacteria and the host. I am interested in how gut bacteria metabolism dietary or host glycans, and how glycans shape microbial communities in the gut.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include fungal protein kinases and phosphatases.

Despoina Mavridou University of Texas at Austin, USA

My research focuses on the extracytoplasmic space of Gram-negative bacteria. I study proteins related to redox homeostasis, oxidative protein folding and hemoprotein biogenesis that function in the cell envelope or on the cell surface.

Jacob Malone John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

My interests involve Pseudomonas primary and secondary metabolic pathways, in the context of host interaction and rhizosphere colonisation. This includes examinations of how primary carbon metabolism adapts to take advantage of different environments and the role of trehalose and glycogen in mediating bacterial stress adaptation.

Nichollas Scott University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

I am interested in how the proteome controls microbial physiology and how protein modifications shapes physiology. I have a specific interest in how glycosylation impacts protein functions as well as the biochemistry of glycoproteins.

Nicholas Tucker University of Strathcylde, Glasgow, UK

My research interests include understanding heavy metal resistance and nitrogen metabolism in Pseudomonas and Streptomyces spp.

This topic area covers the study of host-pathogen interactions with particular emphasis on the pathogenic mechanisms, and the discovery and characterization of microbial virulence factors

Robert Abramovitch Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA

My research aims to understand the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses and adapts to host-immune cues.

Priscille Brodin Centre for Infection and Immunity of Lille, France

My research interests include molecular and cellular signalling pathways targeted by the major mycobacterial virulence factors, namely the ESX1 secretion system and the polyketide mycolactone.

David Clarke University College Cork, Ireland

I have research interests in understanding the genetics of membrane structure, function and homeostasis in Gram negative bacteria and the production of bioactive lipids by bacteria.

Rebecca Hall University of Kent, UK

My research interests include mechanisms that promote fungal pathogenesis.

Kimberly Kline Nanyang Technological University

I am interested in the mechanisms underlying Enterococcal biofilm-associated infections, ranging from gut, wound and urinary tract infections to endocarditis to medical device-associated infections.

Ayush Kumar University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

My research interests include Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) efflux pumps in A. baumannii, establishing their substrate profiles, deciphering their regulatory pathways, and investigating their role in the antibiotic resistance as well as virulence.

Jacob Malone John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

My research interests include bacterial plant pathology, particularly the effects of Pseudomonas syringae genes on plant infection, and the relationship between plant immune system function and various bacterial pathways.

Daniel Neill University of Liverpool, UK

I explore the mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to exploit host resources and promote longevity of infection or transmission to new hosts. This includes studying the role of pore-forming toxin pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis, and investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors that subvert host immune responses. 

Kai Papenfort Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany

I focus on the regulatory mechanism that allow enteric pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, to sense their host, evade the immune system, and ultimately cause disease.

Karen Robinson University of Nottingham, UK

My research is focussed on Helicobacter pylori, and how virulence factors (such as the cag pathogenicity island and duodenal ulcer promoting gene A) interact with host cells to provoke a severe inflammatory response.

Nichollas Scott University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

I am interested in how microbes overcome host defences with the aid of secretion systems/secreted effectors. This provides us a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interaction with the potential to provide new ways to bolster human immunity.

Edward Swords University of Alabama at Birmingham

My research interests relate to the host and microbial determinants of bacterial colonization and persistence during opportunistic airway infections. This includes the persistence of bacteria within biofilm communities, impact of polymicrobial infection on etiology and severity of disease, and quorum signalling networks that coordinate biofilm formation and maturation.

Pedro Oliveira Genoscope, Évry France

My interests include elucidation of novel epigenetic mechanisms driving virulence and pathogenesis in bacteria, as well as the interplay between methylation, DNA topology, and gene expression in key human pathogens.

Meera Unnikrishnan University of Warwick, UK

My research interests include pathogenesis of bacterial infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile), bacterial virulence strategies, intracellular survival mechanisms, gut colonisation and in vitro infection models.

Marjan van der Woude University of York, UK

My interest lies with the molecular strategies that enable a pathogen’s success. My work has largely been on Gram negative bacteria, specifically E. coli and Salmonella. This combines my interests in gene regulation, virulence factors (surface structures), bacteriophage.

This topic covers the biology of plant-associated microorganisms, including plant pathogens, plant symbionts and plant growth-promoting microorganisms. It also includes the biology of soil microorganisms, with a particular focus on the biology of microorganisms that affect soil and plant health and associated ecosystem functions.

Claude Bruand INRAE (French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment), Toulouse, France

I work on rhizobia, soil bacteria able to establish symbiotic interactions with legume plants, during which they fix atmospheric nitrogen to the benefit of the plant.

Nicola Holden Scotland's Rural College, Edinburgh, UK

I am interested in how bacteria adapt to different environments, focusing on human pathogenic bacteria (mostly foodborne) that are transmitted on plants. The bacteria actively interact with plants as (secondary) hosts, and are perceived by the plants immune system. That, together with specific environmental conditions, the plant niche and the endemic microbiome direct the outcome of bacterial colonisation.

Corby Kistler United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, USA

My research interests include the mechanisms by which fungi cause disease in plants, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium oxysporum which causes diseases in crops.

Jacob Malone John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

My research interests include bacterial biocontrol/biostimulation and the wider relationship between rhizobacteria and plants. I examine how microbiomes differ between different environments and plant hosts, and how the Pseudomonas genome adapts to these complex environmental variables.

Vittorio Venturi International Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste, Italy

My scientific interests include how plant associated bacteria undergo interspecies communication and inter-kingdom signalling with plants and the role of LuxR solos in plant associated proteobacteria.

This topics area include research related to the control of gene expression including genome scale studies and molecular mechanisms. Details of how cells perceive and generate signals, either intra- or extra-cellular, are also appropriate.

Robert Abramovitch Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA

My research interests include defining signalling genes and networks required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, including two-component regulatory systems and their regulated genes.

Claude Bruand INRAE (French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment), Toulouse, France

My research interests relate to bacterial stress responses, in particular the general stress response of rhizobia (stress sensing, signal transduction, gene regulation, sigma factors)and the response of rhizobia to nitric oxide (regulation of gene expression, post-translational protein modifications, nitric oxide detoxification).

Fabian Commichau University of Göttingen, Germany

My research focusses on the genomic adaptation of Bacillus subtilis in response to changes in glutamate and identifying the environmental signals that control c-di-AMP synthesis and degradation.

Emma Denham University of Warwick, UK

My research interests include how sRNAs and anti-sense RNAs can effect behaviours of B. subtilis, such as biofilm, competence, metabolic function and anti-microbial resistance.

Rebecca Hall University of Kent, UK

I am interested in how microbes adapt to their immediate environment and how the sensing of multiple environmental cues are integrated into a single response. This not only includes physical environments, but also the presence of other microbes in the environment.

Nicola Holden Scotland's Rural College, Edinburgh, UK

My research interests include how bacterial adaptation to alternative hosts and habitats induces wholescale changes in transient gene expression, and/or selects for specific genotypes. As such regulatory changes or genotypes that increase fitness in secondary hosts & habitats are of interest. Layered on top of this is community interactions and the ability of the ‘newcomer’ to sense, adapt to and establish into an endemic microbiome.

Matt Hutchings John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

I am interested in the regulation of antibiotic production in Streptomyces bacteria, in response to environmental and host derived signals.

Ayush Kumar University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

My research interests include the assembly of RND pump complexes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa to design new therapy that could inhibit these pumps by interfering with the assembly of different components.

David Lee Birmingham City University, UK

My research interests include the regulation of gene expression in bacteria, with particular interest in understanding how the organized bacterial chromosome impacts on, and is impacted by, transcription events.

Jacob Malone John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK

I have interests in the bacterial signalling pathways that control microbial interactions with plants. I have characterized several Pseudomonas signalling pathways at the molecular level. This includes transcription factors, novel translational regulators and second messenger signalling pathways.

Humberto Martín Universidad Complutense Madrid, Spain

My research interests include the MAPK-mediated signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Kai Papenfort Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany

I study the molecular mechanisms underlying gene expression control in microbes with an emphasis on the role of regulatory RNAs in how bacteria detect, distinguish between, and decode information contained in their environment.

Thamarai Schneiders University of Edinburgh, UK

My research interests include study of transcriptional proteins which drive both host- and drug- pathogen interactions in Gram-negative bacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Nicholas Tucker University of Strathcylde, Glasgow, UK

My research interests include transcriptomic studies of DNA-binding antibiotics inhibit transcription as well as regulation of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria.

Meg Vickerman University of Buffalo, NY, USA

I investigate the roles of small peptides from oral streptococci and Enterococcus faecalis that regulate gene expression and influence DNA acquisition via competence and conjugation mechanisms.

Marjan van der Woude University of York, UK

I am interested in understanding regulatory networks, or gaining new insight into regulatory mechanisms and processes, and identifying novel regulation for important genes, since this informs the success of bacteria in their changing environment. My expertise extends to the occurrence and underlying molecular mechanisms of heterogeneous gene expression in clonal populations. My main interest in this area lies with bacterial pathogens and E. coli as a model system.


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