1887

Abstract

Upregulation of the (ultirug esistance 1) gene is involved in the development of resistance to antifungal agents in clinical isolates of the pathogen . To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon, the -acting regulatory elements present in the promoter were characterized using a -galactosidase reporter system. In an azole-susceptible strain, transcription of this reporter is transiently upregulated in response to either benomyl or HO, whereas its expression is constitutively high in an azole-resistant strain (FR2). Two -acting regulatory elements within the promoter were identified that are necessary and sufficient to confer the same transcriptional responses on a heterologous promoter (). One, a enomyl esponse lement (BRE), is situated at position −296 to −260 with respect to the ATG start codon. It is required for benomyl-dependent upregulation and is also necessary for constitutive high expression of . A second element, termed O esponse lement (HRE), is situated at position −561 to −520. The HRE is required for HO-dependent upregulation, but dispensable for constitutive high expression. Two potential binding sites (TTAG/CTAA) for the bZip transcription factor Cap1p ( AP-1 protein) lie within the HRE. Moreover, inactivation of abolished the transient response to HO. Cap1p, which has been previously implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress, may thus play a -acting and positive regulatory role in the HO-dependent transcription of . A minimal BRE (−290 to −273) that is sufficient to detect sequence-specific binding of protein complexes in crude extracts prepared from was also defined. Interestingly, the sequence includes a perfect match to the consensus binding sequence of Mcm1p, raising the possibility that may be a direct target of this MADS box transcriptional activator. In conclusion, while the identity of the -acting factors that bind to the BRE and HRE remains to be confirmed, the tools developed during this characterization of the -acting elements of the promoter should now serve to elucidate the nature of the components that modulate its activity.

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2006-12-01
2020-12-03
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