1887

Abstract

The complete 41 268 bp nucleotide sequence of the IncP-1 plasmid pBP136 from the human pathogen , the primary aetiological agent of whooping cough, was determined and analysed. This plasmid carried a total of 46 ORFs: 44 ORFs corresponding to the genes in the conserved IncP-1 backbone, and 2 ORFs similar to the and genes with unknown function of the plant pathogen . Interestingly, pBP136 had no accessory genes carrying genetic traits such as antibiotic or mercury resistance and/or xenobiotic degradation. Moreover, pBP136 had only two of the genes () that have been reported to be important for the stability of IncP-1 plasmid in . Phylogenetic analysis of the Kle proteins revealed that the KleA and KleE of pBP136 were phylogenetically distant from those of the present IncP-1 plasmids. In contrast, IncC1 and KorC, encoded upstream and downstream of the genes respectively, and the replication-initiation protein, TrfA, were closely related to those of the IncP-1 ‘R751 group’. These results suggest that (i) pBP136 without any apparent accessory genes diverged early from an ancestor of the present IncP-1 plasmids, especially those of the R751 group, and (ii) the genes might be incorporated independently into the backbone region of the IncP-1 plasmids for their stable maintenance in various host cells.

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2006-12-01
2020-12-03
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