1887

Abstract

Experiments were done to define the nature of the xylan-derived induction signal for xylanase activity, and evaluate which xylanase genes among the three known ones (, and ) are induced by the presence of xylan in B4. During the later stages of exponential growth on glucose, addition of 0·05 % water-soluble xylan (WS-X) stimulated xylanase formation within 30 min. Xylose, xylobiose, xylotriose, xylotetraose, xylopentaose, arabinose and glucuronic acid all failed to induce the xylanase activity. An acid-ethanol-soluble fraction of WS-X (approximate degree of polymerization 30) enhanced the activity significantly, whereas the acid-ethanol-insoluble fraction had no effect, unless first digested by the cloned XynC xylanase. These results indicate that medium- to large-sized xylo-oligosaccharides are responsible for induction. The transcription of all three known xylanase genes from was upregulated coordinately by addition of WS-X. There have been relatively few investigations into the regulation of xylanase activity in bacteria, and it appears to be unique that medium- to large-sized xylo-oligosaccharides are responsible for induction.

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2005-12-01
2020-08-04
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