1887

Abstract

In response to stimulants, such as serum, the yeast cells of the opportunistic fungal pathogen form germ tubes, which develop into hyphae. Yvh1p, one of the 29 protein phosphatases encoded in the genome, has 45 % identity with the dual-specific phosphatase Yvh1p of the model yeast . In this study, Yvh1p expression was not observed during the initial step of germ tube formation, although Yvh1p was expressed constitutively in cell cycle progression of yeast or hyphal cells. In an attempt to analyse the function of Yvh1p phosphatase, the complete ORFs of both alleles were deleted by replacement with and . Although has nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms in its coding sequence, both alleles were able to complement the gene disruptant. The vegetative growth of Δ was significantly slower than the wild-type. The hyphal growth of Δ on agar, or in a liquid medium, was also slower than the wild-type because of the delay in nuclear division and septum formation, although germ tube formation was similar between the wild-type and the disruptant. Despite the slow hyphal growth, the expression of several hypha-specific genes in Δ was not delayed or repressed compared with that of the wild-type. Infection studies using mouse models revealed that the virulence of Δ was less than that of the wild-type. Thus, contributes to normal vegetative yeast or hyphal cell cycle progression and pathogenicity, but not to germ tube formation.

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2005-07-01
2019-11-19
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