1887

Abstract

Yeast wall protein 1 (Ywp1, also called Pga24) of is predicted to be a 533 aa polypeptide with an N-terminal secretion signal, a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor signal and a central region rich in serine and threonine. In yeast cultures, Ywp1p appeared to be linked covalently to glucans of the wall matrix, but, as cultures approached stationary phase, Ywp1p accumulated in the medium and was extractable from cells with disulfide-reducing agents. An 11 kDa propeptide of Ywp1p was also present in these soluble fractions; it possessed the sole -glycan of Ywp1p and served as a useful marker for Ywp1p. DNA vaccines encoding all or part of Ywp1p generated analytically useful antisera in mice, but did not increase survival times for disseminated candidiasis. Replacement of the coding sequence of with the fluorescent reporter revealed that expression of is greatest during yeast exponential-phase growth, but downregulated in stationary phase and upon filamentation. Expression was upregulated when the extracellular phosphate concentration was low. Disruption by homologous recombination of both alleles resulted in no obvious change in growth, morphology or virulence, but the Ywp1p-deficient blastoconidia exhibited increased adhesiveness and biofilm formation, suggesting that Ywp1p may promote dispersal of yeast forms of .

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2005-05-01
2019-10-13
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vol. , part 5, pp. 1631 – 1644

Phosphate uptake

Role of Ywp1p in virulence

Differences in culture media and mouse ages, along with the slight differences in inoculum doses, were not obviously correlated with survival times

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