1887

Abstract

The gene of SN2 (Ms) was cloned from two independent partial genomic DNA libraries and characterized, along with the identification of and as the neighbouring upstream and downstream genes respectively. The genomic organization of the Ms locus was found to be identical to that of the gene (Mt) and similar to that of other bacterial genera, but with divergence in the upstream region. The Ms gene is 2·3 kb in size and encodes the AAA (TPases ssociated with diverse cellular ctivities) family Zn-metalloprotease FtsH (MsFtsH) of 85 kDa molecular mass. This was demonstrated from the expression of the full-length recombinant gene in JM109 cells and from the identification of native MsFtsH in SN2 cell lysates by Western blotting with anti-MtFtsH and anti-EcFtsH antibodies respectively. The recombinant and the native MsFtsH proteins were found localized to the membrane of and cells respectively. Expression of MsFtsH protein in was toxic and resulted in growth arrest and filamentation of cells. The Ms gene did not complement lethality of a Δ3 : : kan mutation in , but when expressed in cells, it efficiently degraded conventional FtsH substrates, namely protein and the protein translocase subunit SecY, of cells.

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2004-08-01
2020-04-02
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