1887

Abstract

High-level resistance to class IIa bacteriocins has been directly associated with the absent EIIAB (MptA) subunit of the mannose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) () in strains. Class IIa bacteriocin-resistant strains used in this study were a spontaneous resistant, B73-MR1, and a defined mutant, EGDe-. Both strains were previously reported to have the EIIAB PTS component missing. This study shows that these class IIa bacteriocin-resistant strains have significantly decreased specific growth and glucose consumption rates, but they also have a significantly higher growth yield than their corresponding wild-type strains, B73 and EGDe, respectively. In the presence of glucose, the strains showed a shift from a predominantly lactic-acid to a mixed-acid fermentation. It is here proposed that elimination of the EIIAB in the resistant strains has caused a reduced glucose consumption rate and a reduced specific growth rate. The lower glucose consumption rate can be correlated to a shift in metabolism to a more efficient pathway with respect to ATP production per glucose, leading to a higher biomass yield. Thus, the cost involved in obtaining bacteriocin resistance, i.e. losing substrate transport capacity leading to a lower growth rate, is compensated for by a higher biomass yield.

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2004-02-01
2020-07-16
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