1887

Abstract

subsp. () enters intestinal epithelial cells of cattle and other ruminants via a mechanism that remains to be fully elucidated. This study showed that a gene encoding the 35 kDa major membrane protein (MMP) is expressed at a higher level in low-oxygen and high-osmolarity conditions that are similar to the environment of the intestine. In addition, cattle with Johne's disease produced antibodies against MMP, suggesting that the protein is present during infection. The gene encoding MMP was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP–MMP) in . Rabbit antisera were raised against a whole-cell sonicate and MMP-specific antibodies were purified from these sera by affinity chromatography. MMP was localized to the surface of by immunoelectron microscopy and by immunoblot analysis of fractionated protein lysates. Both anti-MMP antibodies and MBP–MMP protein inhibited invasion of cultured Madin–Darby bovine kidney cells by 30 %. In similar invasion experiments with incubated in low oxygen tension, these antibodies and protein decreased invasion by 60 %. Collectively, these data show that the 35 kDa MMP is a surface exposed protein that plays a role in invasion of epithelial cells. The authors suggest that the MMP is a virulence factor of that may be important in the initiation of infection .

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2003-08-01
2019-10-24
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