1887

Abstract

The glyoxylate cycle, a metabolic pathway required for generating C units from C compounds, is an important factor in virulence, in both animal and plant pathogens. Here, we report the localization of the key enzymes of this cycle, isocitrate lyase (Icl1; EC 4.1.3.1) and malate synthase (Mls1; EC 2.3.3.9), in the human fungal pathogen . Immunocytochemistry in combination with subcellular fractionation showed that both Icl1 and Mls1 are localized to peroxisomes, independent of the carbon source used. Although Icl1 and Mls1 lack a consensus type I peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1), their import into peroxisomes was dependent on the PTS1 receptor Pex5p, suggesting the presence of non-canonical targeting signals in both proteins. Peroxisomal compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle is not essential for proper functioning of this metabolic pathway because a ΔΔ strain, in which Icl1 and Mls1 were localized to the cytosol, grew equally as well as the wild-type strain on acetate and ethanol. Previously, we reported that a ΔΔ strain that is completely deficient in fatty acid -oxidation, but has no peroxisomal protein import defect, displayed strongly reduced growth on non-fermentable carbon sources such as acetate and ethanol. Here, we show that growth of the ΔΔ strain on these carbon compounds can be restored when Icl1 and Mls1 are relocated to the cytosol by deleting the gene. We hypothesize that the ΔΔ strain is disturbed in the transport of glyoxylate cycle products and/or acetyl-CoA across the peroxisomal membrane and discuss the possible relationship between such a transport defect and the presence of giant peroxisomes in the ΔΔ mutant.

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2008-10-01
2020-11-28
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