1887

Abstract

susbp. is a capnophilic Gram-positive heterotroph with optimal growth in 4 % CO-enriched air. At low inorganic carbon (C) concentrations, the genes encoding the enzymes of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway were overexpressed, in agreement with a previous study showing that these genes are regulated at the transcription level in response to C via a PyrR-mediated mechanism. A previous study of high-CO-requiring (HCR) mutants revealed an unknown genetic link between arginine regulation and C-dependent nutritional needs. To better understand 's adaptation to C availability, additional C-responsive genes were sought in the arginine biosynthetic pathway ( and genes) using slot-blot hybridization and a proteomic differential 2D gel electrophoresis (DIGE) global approach. Besides the nine -encoded proteins, 16 new Icr (inorganic-carbon-regulated) proteins accumulated differentially in response to C availability, suggesting that the C response involves several metabolic pathways and adaptation processes. Among these Icr proteins only argininosuccinate lyase, encoded by , was involved in arginine biosynthesis. Three proteins involved in the purine biosynthetic pathway and nucleotide conversion, adenylate kinase (Adk), GMP synthase (GuaA), and IMP dehydrogenase (GuaB), accumulated differentially in response to changes in C levels. Expression of the Icr protein-encoding genes and was regulated at the transcription level or by RNA stability in response to C availability, as previously demonstrated for the genes. However, PyrR was not essential for the C-regulated transcription of and , demonstrating that PyrR modulates only a subset of C-regulated genes. These results suggest that the C response may involve at least two regulatory mechanisms in .

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2008-09-01
2020-03-28
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