1887

Abstract

NaBP, found in alkaliphilic OF4, is a member of the bacterial voltage-gated Na channel superfamily. The alkaliphile requires NaBP for normal chemotaxis responses and for optimal pH homeostasis during a shift to alkaline conditions at suboptimally low Na concentrations. We hypothesized that interaction of NaBP with one or more other proteins , specifically methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs), is involved in activation of the channel under the pH conditions that exist in the extremophile and could underpin its role in chemotaxis; MCPs transduce chemotactic signals and generally localize to cell poles of rod-shaped cells. Here, immunofluorescence microscopy and fluorescent protein fusion studies showed that an alkaliphile protein (designated McpX) that cross-reacts with antibodies raised against McpB co-localizes with NaBP at the cell poles of OF4. In a mutant in which NaBP-encoding is deleted, the content of McpX was close to the wild-type level but McpX was significantly delocalized. A mutant of OF4 was constructed in which expression was disrupted to assess whether this mutation impaired polar localization of McpX, as expected from studies in and , and, if so, whether NaBP would be similarly affected. Polar localization of both McpX and NaBP was decreased in the mutant. The results suggest interactions between McpX and NaBP that affect their co-localization. The inverse chemotaxis phenotype of mutants may result in part from MCP delocalization.

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2007-12-01
2021-07-30
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