1887

Abstract

Phagosomal transporters (Phts), required for intracellular growth of , comprise a novel family of multispanning -helical proteins within the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). The members of this family derive exclusively from bacteria. Multiple paralogues are present in a restricted group of - and , but single members were also found in and . Their protein sequences were aligned, yielding a phylogenetic tree showing the relations of the proteins to each other. Topological analyses revealed a probable 12 -helical transmembrane segment (TMS) topology. Motif identification and statistical analyses provided convincing evidence that these proteins arose from a six TMS precursor by intragenic duplication. The phylogenetic tree revealed some potential orthologous relationships, suggestive of common function. However, several probable examples of lateral transfer of the encoding genetic material between bacteria were identified and analysed. The Pht family most closely resembles a smaller MFS family (the UMF9 family) with no functionally characterized members. However, the UMF9 family occurs in a broader range of prokaryotic organism types, including . These two families differ in that organisms bearing members of the Pht family often have numerous paralogues, whereas organisms bearing members of the UMF9 family never have more than two. This work serves to characterize two novel families within the MFS and provides compelling evidence for horizontal transfer of some of the family members.

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2008-01-01
2019-12-06
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Multiple alignment of the members of the Pht family.

Mean hydropathy (black line, top), amphipathicity (light grey line, top) and similarity (bottom) plots for the Pht family, based on the multiple alignment shown in Fig. S1. The AveHas program (Zhai & Saier, 2001) was used to derive the plot. Bars above the 12 peaks of hydrophobicity correspond to the 12 putative TMSs.

IMAGE

Multiple alignment of the members of the UMF9 family.

Mean hydropathy (black line, top), amphipathicity (light grey line, top) and similarity (bottom) plots for the UMF9 family, based on the multiple alignment shown in Fig. S3. The AveHas program (Zhai & Saier, 2001) was used to derive the plot. Bars above the 12 peaks of hydrophobicity correspond to the 12 putative TMSs.

IMAGE

Proteins of the Pht family arranged alphabetically according to protein abbreviation.

Proteins of the UMF9 family arranged alphabetically according to protein abbreviation.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of Prochlorococcus marinus.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of Coxiella burnetii.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of Legionella pneumophila.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

Codon usage table for (1) the gene and (2) the genome of its source organism.

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