1887

Abstract

YadB and YadC are putative trimeric autotransporters present only in the plague bacterium and its evolutionary predecessor, . Previously, was found to promote invasion of epithelioid cells by grown at 37 °C. In this study, we found that also promotes uptake of 37 °C-grown by mouse monocyte/macrophage cells. We tested whether might be required for lethality of the systemic stage of plague in which the bacteria would be pre-adapted to mammalian body temperature before colonizing internal organs and found no requirement for early colonization or growth over 3 days. We tested the hypothesis that YadB and YadC function on ambient temperature-grown in the flea vector or soon after infection of the dermis in bubonic plague. We found that did not promote uptake by monocyte/macrophage cells if the bacteria were grown at 28 °C, nor was there a role of in colonization of fleas by grown at 21 °C. However, the presence of did promote recoverability of the bacteria from infected skin for 28 °C-grown . Furthermore, the gene for the proinflammatory chemokine CXCL1 was upregulated in expression if the infecting lacked but not if was present. Also, was not required for recoverability if the bacteria were grown at 37 °C. These findings imply that thermally induced virulence properties dominate over effects of during plague but that has a unique function early after transmission of to skin.

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2014-02-01
2020-04-04
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