1887

Abstract

The opportunistic fungal pathogen is one of the leading agents of life-threatening infections affecting immunocompromised individuals. Many factors make a successful pathogen. These include the ability to switch between yeast and invasive hyphal morphologies in addition to an arsenal of cell wall virulence factors such as lipases, proteases, dismutases and adhesins that promote the attachment to the host, a prerequisite for invasive growth. We have previously characterized Hwp2, a cell wall protein which we found necessary for proper oxidative stress, biofilm formation and adhesion to host cells. Baker’s yeast also possesses adhesins that promote aggregation and flocculence. Flo11 is one such adhesin that has sequence similarity to Hwp2. Here we determined that transforming an HWP2 cassette can complement the lack of filamentation of an flo11 null strain and impart on adhesive properties similar to those of a pathogen.

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2013-06-01
2020-01-28
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