1887

Abstract

Hemiascomycetes, including the pathogen , acquire nitrogen from urea using the urea amidolyase Dur1,2, whereas all other higher fungi use primarily the nickel-containing urease. Urea metabolism via Dur1,2 is important for resistance to innate host immunity in infections. To further characterize urea metabolism in we examined the function of seven putative urea transporters. Gene disruption established that Dur3, encoded by orf 19.781, is the predominant transporter. [C]Urea uptake was energy-dependent and decreased approximately sevenfold in a Δ mutant. and expression was strongly induced by urea, whereas the other putative transporter genes were induced less than twofold. Immediate induction of by urea was independent of its metabolism via Dur1,2, but further slow induction of required the Dur1,2 pathway. We investigated the role of the GATA transcription factors Gat1 and Gln3 in and expression. Urea induction of was reduced in a Δ mutant, strongly reduced in a Δ mutant, and abolished in a Δ Δ double mutant. In contrast, induction by urea was preserved in both single mutants but reduced in the double mutant, suggesting that additional signalling mechanisms regulate expression. These results establish Dur3 as the major urea transporter in and provide additional insights into the control of urea utilization by this pathogen.

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2011-01-01
2019-08-23
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