1887

Abstract

The oral microbiota plays an important role in buccal health and in diseases such as periodontitis and meningitis. The study of the human oral bacteria has so far focused on subjects from Western societies, while little is known about subjects from isolated communities. This work determined the composition of the oral mucosa microbiota from six Amazon Amerindians, and tested a sample preservation alternative to freezing. Paired oral swabs were taken from six adults of Guahibo ethnicity living in the community of Platanillal, Amazonas State, Venezuela. Replicate swabs were preserved in liquid nitrogen and in Aware Messenger fluid (Calypte). Buccal DNA was extracted, and the V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced. A total of 17 214 oral bacterial sequences were obtained from the six subjects; these were binned into 1034 OTUs from 10 phyla, 30 families and 51 genera. The oral mucosa was highly dominated by four phyla: (mostly the genera and ), (mostly ), () and (). Although the microbiota were similar at the phylum level, the Amerindians shared only 62 % of the families and 23 % of the genera with non-Amerindians from previous studies, and had a lower richness of genera (51 vs 177 reported in non-Amerindians). The Amerindians carried unidentified members of the phyla , and and their microbiota included soil bacteria Gp1 () and (), and the rare genus (). Preserving buccal swabs in the Aware Messenger oral fluid collection device substantially altered the bacterial composition in comparison to freezing, and therefore this method cannot be used to preserve samples for the study of microbial communities.

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2010-11-01
2019-10-14
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Bacteria present in Amerindians (this study) or reported previously in non-Amerindians [ PDF] (90 kb) Numbers of bacterial sequences by genus in the oral mucosa of the six Amerindian subjects [ PDF] (29 kb) Numbers of bacterial families and genera found in the oral mucosa of Amerindians (this study) and in saliva from non-Amerindians [ PDF] (15 kb)

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Bacteria present in Amerindians (this study) or reported previously in non-Amerindians [ PDF] (90 kb) Numbers of bacterial sequences by genus in the oral mucosa of the six Amerindian subjects [ PDF] (29 kb) Numbers of bacterial families and genera found in the oral mucosa of Amerindians (this study) and in saliva from non-Amerindians [ PDF] (15 kb)

PDF

Bacteria present in Amerindians (this study) or reported previously in non-Amerindians [ PDF] (90 kb) Numbers of bacterial sequences by genus in the oral mucosa of the six Amerindian subjects [ PDF] (29 kb) Numbers of bacterial families and genera found in the oral mucosa of Amerindians (this study) and in saliva from non-Amerindians [ PDF] (15 kb)

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