1887

Abstract

Haematophagous arthropods are the primary vectors in the transmission of , yet the molecular mechanisms mediating the rickettsial infection of arthropods remain elusive. This study utilized a biotinylated protein pull-down assay together with LC-MS/MS to identify interaction between histone H2B and . Co-immunoprecipitation of histone with rickettsial cell lysate demonstrated the association of H2B with proteins, including outer-membrane protein B (OmpB), a major rickettsial adhesin molecule. The rickettsial infection of tick ISE6 cells was reduced by approximately 25 % via RNA-mediated H2B-depletion or enzymic treatment of histones. The interaction of H2B with the rickettsial adhesin OmpB suggests a role for H2B in mediating internalization into ISE6 cells.

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2010-09-01
2021-08-01
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