1887

Abstract

One hundred and twenty pathogenic isolates of pv. phaseolicola recovered in Spain were subjected to biochemical and genomic typing, and investigated for virulence gene complement. Fifty-six were recovered from common beans () of the type Granja Asturiana, grown in a northern Spanish region (Asturias), and 64 from other common beans cultured in the neighbouring region of Castilla y León. Typing by I digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed 27 profiles, with only three being common to both regions. Relationships between profiles distributed the isolates into two clusters: A (subdivided into subclusters A1 and A2) and B. Cluster A included all isolates from Granja Asturiana and about a quarter of the isolates from Castilla y León. Isolates from cluster A were negative for mannitol utilization and hybridized to probes for the region responsible for phaseolotoxin production. Isolates that grouped in cluster B, which were only found in Castilla y León, were able to utilize mannitol but did not hybridize to probes for the region. Separation of the isolates into three genomic groups, subsequently termed PphA1, PphA2 and PphB, was also supported by effector gene complement and location. In PphB, all effector genes tested (, , and ) mapped on chromosomal fragments, but faint hybridization of with plasmids of about 40 kb was also observed. In PphA mapped on the chromosome; in PphA1 and were carried on virulence plasmids (most of approx. 125 kb) and was not detected, while in PphA2 the three genes were located on plasmids (approx. 75–160 kb). These results can be used as a framework to investigate the basis of regional variation in population structure, and for further epidemiological surveillance of pv. phaseolicola.

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2010-06-01
2019-12-08
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vol. , part 6, pp. 1795 - 1804

( PDF, 68 kb): Isolates of pv. phaseolicola recovered in Asturias (Spain) from common beans of the type Granja Asturiana Isolates of pv. phaseolicola recovered in Castilla y León (Spain) from different common bean varieties



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