1887

Abstract

In addition to the known response regulator ErbR (former AgmR) and the two-component regulatory system EraSR (former ExaDE), three additional regulatory proteins have been identified as being involved in controlling transcription of the aerobic ethanol oxidation system in . Two putative sensor kinases, ErcS and ErcS′, and a response regulator, ErdR, were found, all of which show significant similarity to the two-component system that controls methanol and formaldehyde metabolism in . All three identified response regulators, EraR (formerly ExaE), ErbR (formerly AgmR) and ErdR, are members of the family. The three sensor kinases EraS (formerly ExaD), ErcS and ErcS′ do not contain a membrane domain. Apparently, they are localized in the cytoplasm and recognize cytoplasmic signals. Inactivation of gene caused an extended lag phase on ethanol. Inactivation of both genes, and ′, resulted in no growth at all on ethanol, as did inactivation of . Of the three sensor kinases and three response regulators identified thus far, only the EraSR (formerly ExaDE) system forms a corresponding kinase/regulator pair. Using reporter gene constructs of all identified regulatory genes in different mutants allowed the hierarchy of a hypothetical complex regulatory network to be established. Probably, two additional sensor kinases and two additional response regulators, which are hidden among the numerous regulatory genes annotated in the genome of , remain to be identified.

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2010-05-01
2019-10-21
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