1887

Abstract

28 is a Cr(VI)-hyper-resistant bacterium. A Cr(VI)-sensitive mutant was obtained by insertional mutagenesis using EZ-Tn <R6K/KAN-2>Tnp. The mutant strain was impaired in a gene, here named (rganoulphur ompounds), which encoded a hypothetical small protein of unknown function. The gene was located upstream of a gene cluster that encodes the components of the sulphate ABC transporter, and it formed a transcriptional unit with , which encoded the periplasmic binding protein of the transporter. The transcriptional unit was strongly and quickly overexpressed after chromate exposure, suggesting the involvement of in chromate resistance, which was further confirmed by means of a complementation experiment. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) analysis made it possible to assay 1536 phenotypes and also indicated that the gene was involved in the utilization of organosulphur compounds as a sole source of sulphur. This is believed to be the first evidence that plays a role in activating a sulphur starvation response, which is required to cope with oxidative stress induced by chromate.

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2009-01-01
2020-09-21
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