1887

Abstract

DNA damage often causes an arrest of the cell cycle that provides time for genome integrity to be restored. In bacteria, the classical SOS DNA damage response leads to an inhibition of cell division resulting in temporarily filamentous growth. This raises the question as to whether such a response mechanism might similarly function in naturally filamentous bacteria such as exhibit two functionally distinct forms of cell division: cross-wall formation in vegetative hyphae and sporulation septation in aerial hyphae. Here, we show that the genotoxic agent mitomycin C confers a block in sporulation septation in in a mechanism that involves, at least in part, the downregulation of . Notably, this DNA damage response does not appear to block cross-wall formation and may be independent of canonical SOS and developmental regulators. We also show that the mitomycin C-induced block in sporulation can be partially bypassed by the constitutive expression of , though this appears to be largely limited to mitomycin C treatment and the resultant spore-like cells have reduced viability.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/J004561/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • Royal Society (Award RGF\EA\181026)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SusanSchlimpert
  • Royal Society (Award URF\R1\180075)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SusanSchlimpert
  • Institute of Infection and Immunity (Award MID-406688)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JustinR. Nodwell
  • Mitacs (Award IT14924)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JanVT. Falguera
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-06-15
2022-06-28
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