1887

Abstract

Despite renewed interest, development of chemical biology methods to study peptidoglycan metabolism has lagged in comparison to the glycobiology field in general. To address this, a panel of diamides were screened against the Gram-positive bacterium to identify inhibitors of bacterial growth. The screen identified the diamide masarimycin as a bacteriostatic inhibitor of growth with an MIC of 8 µM. The diamide inhibited detergent-induced autolysis in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating perturbation of peptidoglycan degradation as the mode-of-action. Cell based screening of masarimycin against a panel of autolysin mutants, identified a higher MIC against a Δ strain lacking an endo-N-acetylglucosaminidase involved in cell division. Subsequent biochemical and phenotypic analyses suggested that the higher MIC was due to an indirect interaction with LytB. Further analysis of changes to the cell surface in masarimycin treated cells identified the overexpression of several moonlighting proteins, including elongation factor Tu which is implicated in regulating cell shape. Checkerboard assays using masarimycin in concert with additional antibiotics identified an antagonistic relationship with the cell wall targeting antibiotic fosfomycin, which further supports a cell wall mode-of-action.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences (Award P20GM103430)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • National Science Foundation (Award 1919644)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • Division of Chemistry (Award CHE2009522)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ChristopherW Reid
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001182
2022-04-25
2022-05-22
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