1887

Abstract

Mycobacteriophage D29 infects species belonging to the genus Mycobacterium including the deadly pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. D29 is a lytic phage, although, related to the lysogenic mycobacteriophage L5. This phage is unable to lysogenize in mycobacteria as it lacks the gene encoding the phage repressor. Infection by many mycobacteriophages cause various changes in the host that ultimately leads to inactivation of the latter. One of the host targets often modified in the process is RNA polymerase. During our investigations with phage D29 infected (Msm) we observed that the promoters from both phage, and to a lesser extent those of the host were found to be more active in cells that were exposed to D29, as compared to the unexposed. Further experiments indicate that the RNA polymerase purified from phage infected cells possessed higher affinity for promoters particularly those that were phage derived. Comparison of the purified RNA polymerase preparations from infected and uninfected cells showed that several ancillary transcription factors, Sigma factor F, Sigma factor H, CarD and RbpA are prominently associated with the RNA polymerase from infected cells. Based on our observations we conclude that the higher activity of RNA polymerase observed in D29 infected cells is due to its increased association with ancillary transcription factors.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Science and Technology (Award SR/WosA/LS 68/2018G)
    • Principle Award Recipient: SHREYASENGUPTA
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001158
2022-03-30
2022-05-18
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