1887

Abstract

Members of are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, some of which have been implicated in human infections. The progenitors of antibiotic resistance genes with clinical relevance, such as genes, have been identified in code for a pentapeptide repeat protein that protects type II topoisomerases, decreasing susceptibility to quinolones and fluoroquinolones. In this study, 248 genomes of 49 species were analysed as well as 33 environmental isolates belonging to 10 species. The presence of the gene was detected in 22.9% of the genomes and 15.2% of the isolates. The gene was more often detected in , but was also detected in , , and . The identified genes encoded the previously described variants QnrA3 (in 22 genomes of one species), QnrA2 (eight genomes and three species), QnrA1 (six genomes and two species), QnrA7 (five genomes and two species), QnrA10 (two genomes of one species) and QnrA4 (one genome). In addition, 11 novel variants with 3 to 7 amino acid substitutions were identified (in 13 genomes and one environmental isolate). The presence of this gene appears to be species-specific although within some species several variants were detected. The study presents a previously unknown diversity of in , highlighting the role of this genus as progenitor and reservoir of these genes. Further studies are needed to determine the phenotypes conferred by the new variants and the mechanisms that may mediate the transfer of these genes to new hosts.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Award SFRH/BD/52573/2014)
    • Principle Award Recipient: AraújoSusana
  • Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Award CEECIND/00977/2020)
    • Principle Award Recipient: TacãoMarta
  • Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Award UIDP/50017/2020+UIDB/50017/2020)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ApplicableNot
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001118
2021-12-16
2024-07-23
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