1887

Abstract

In (renamed ) glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) level is exceptionally high as compared to other bacteria, for example. Earlier investigations have indicated that G6P protects (Msm) against oxidative stress-inducing agents. G6P is a glycolytic intermediate formed either directly through the phosphorylation of glucose or indirectly via the gluconeogenic pathway. Its consumption is catalysed by several enzymes, one of which being the NADPH dependent G6P dehydrogenase (G6PDH) encoded by ). While investigating the extent to which the carbon sources glucose and glycerol influence Msm growth, we observed that intracellular concentration of G6P was lower in the former’s presence than the latter. We could correlate this difference with that in the growth rate, which was higher in glycerol than glucose. We also found that lowering of G6P content in glucose-grown cells was triggered by the induced expression of and the resultant increase in G6PDH activity. When we silenced using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we observed a significant rise in the growth rate of Msm. Therefore, we have found that depletion of G6P in glucose-grown cells due to increased G6PDH activity is at least one reason why the growth rate of Msm in glucose is less than glycerol. However, we could not establish a similar link-up between slow growth in glucose and lowering of G6P level in the case of (Mtb). Mycobacteria, therefore, may have evolved diverse mechanisms to ensure that they use glycerol preferentially over glucose for their growth.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
    • Principle Award Recipient: AnikBarman
  • Bose Institute, Kolkata
    • Principle Award Recipient: PoulamiGhosh
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001067
2021-07-08
2021-07-27
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