1887

Abstract

Treatment of tuberculosis requires a multi-drug regimen administered for at least 6 months. The long-term chemotherapy is attributed in part to a minor subpopulation of nonreplicating cells that exhibit phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. The origins of these cells in infected hosts remain unclear. Here we discuss some recent evidence supporting the hypothesis that hibernation of ribosomes in induced by zinc starvation, could be one of the primary mechanisms driving the development of nonreplicating persisters in hosts. We further analyse inconsistencies in previously reported studies to clarify the molecular principles underlying mycobacterial ribosome hibernation.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences (Award GM061576)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RajendraK Agrawal
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Award AI144474)
    • Principle Award Recipient: AnilK Ojha
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Award AI132422)
    • Principle Award Recipient: AnilK Ojha
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2021-02-08
2021-10-25
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