1887

Abstract

Biofilm formation in the human intestinal pathogen is in part regulated by norspermidine, spermidine and spermine. senses these polyamines through a signalling pathway consisting of the periplasmic protein, NspS, and the integral membrane c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase MbaA. NspS and MbaA belong to a proposed class of novel signalling systems composed of periplasmic ligand-binding proteins and membrane-bound c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases containing both GGDEF and EAL domains. In this signal transduction pathway, NspS is hypothesized to interact with MbaA in the periplasm to regulate its phosphodiesterase activity. Polyamine binding to NspS likely alters this interaction, leading to the activation or inhibition of biofilm formation depending on the polyamine. The purpose of this study was to determine the amino acids important for NspS function. We performed random mutagenesis of the gene, identified mutant clones deficient in biofilm formation, determined their responsiveness to norspermidine and mapped the location of these residues onto NspS homology models. Single mutants clustered on two lobes of the NspS model, but the majority were found on a single lobe that appeared to be more mobile upon norspermidine binding. We also identified residues in the putative ligand-binding site that may be important for norspermidine binding and interactions with MbaA. Ultimately, our results provide new insights into this novel signalling pathway in and highlight differences between periplasmic binding proteins involved in transport versus signal transduction.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • ECEKARATAN , National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases , (Award R15AI096358)
  • MistyL Kuhn , National Institute of General Medical Sciences , (Award R35GM133506)
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001023
2021-01-27
2021-02-26
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