1887

Abstract

the aetiological agent of cholera, possesses multiple iron acquisition systems, including those for the transport of siderophores. How these systems benefit in low-iron, polymicrobial communities in environmental settings or during infection remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in iron-limiting conditions, co-culture of with a number of individual siderophore-producing microbes significantly promoted growth . We further show that in the host environment with low iron, colonizes better in adult mice in the presence of the siderophore-producing commensal . Taken together, our results suggest that in aquatic reservoirs or during infection, may overcome environmental and host iron restriction by hijacking siderophores from other microbes.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Hyuntae Byun , National Institutes of Health , (Award AI137283)
  • Hyuntae Byun , National Institutes of Health , (Award AI120489)
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000975
2020-10-19
2021-01-21
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