1887

Abstract

In nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, emerging evidence shows significant roles for polyamines in growth and abiotic stress resistance. In this work we show that a polyamine-deficient ornithine decarboxylase null mutant () derived from Rm8530 had significant phenotypic differences from the wild-type, including greatly reduced production of exopolysaccharides (EPS; ostensibly both succinoglycan and galactoglucan), increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and decreased swimming motility. The introduction of the gene borne on a plasmid into the mutant restored wild-type phenotypes for EPS production, growth under oxidative stress and swimming. The production of calcofluor-binding EPS (succinoglycan) by the mutant was also completely or mostly restored in the presence of exogenous spermidine (Spd), norspermidine (NSpd) or spermine (Spm). The mutant formed about 25 % more biofilm than the wild-type, and its ability to form biofilm was significantly inhibited by exogenous Spd, NSpd or Spm. The mutant formed a less efficient symbiosis with alfalfa, resulting in plants with significantly less biomass and height, more nodules but less nodule biomass, and 25 % less nitrogen-fixing activity. Exogenously supplied Put was not able to revert these phenotypes and caused a similar increase in plant height and dry weight in uninoculated plants and in those inoculated with the wild-type or mutant. We discuss ways in which polyamines might affect the phenotypes of the mutant.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000886
2020-01-14
2020-01-24
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