1887

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and are frequently co-associated during acute respiratory infections, particularly amongst infants and young children. In this study, we aimed to identify strains of RSV and serotypes/sequence types of associated with co-infections within a cohort of paediatric patients, and to assess RSV-mediated adhesion of pneumococcal isolates. The RSV glycoprotein sequence was determined for 58 RSV-positive samples and molecular serotyping and MLST was used to analyse 26 pneumococcal isolates. We also compared 23 pneumococcal isolates for their adherence to RSV-infected or mock-infected airway epithelia cells using immunofluorescence microscopy and automated particle counting. The tight association between RSV and was also visualized using scanning electron microscopy. This study did not identify any statistically significant trend in the strains of RSV and associated with co-infections. Furthermore, almost all isolates (22 of 23) showed significantly increased adherence to RSV-infected cells. The level of adherence did not appear to correlate with pneumococcal strain or sequence type, and isolates obtained from RSV-infected patients displayed a similar level of adherence as those from RSV-negative patients. The absence of particular or RSV strains associated with co-infection, together with the near ubiquitous presence of RSV-mediated adhesion throughout the pneumococcal clinical isolates, may indicate that the mechanisms governing the association with RSV are of sufficient importance to be maintained across much of the species.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000870
2019-11-12
2019-12-09
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